In the UK, 1 in 4 black men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime, double the 1 in 8 risk faced by all men. We don’t know why, but you can help us find out. These supporters show us why it’s so important.

9 Oct 2020

In the UK, 1 in 4 black men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime, double the 1 in 8 risk faced by all men. We don’t know why, but you can help us find out. These supporters show us why it’s so important.

At the moment we don’t know why black men and men with a family history have a higher risk of prostate cancer. We do know it’s linked to genes.

Understanding your risk factors can save lives, especially because prostate cancer often has no symptoms. The pandemic caused a huge drop in the amount of men being referred to a specialist for suspected prostate cancer. This means thousands of men have undetected cancer, and existing health inequalities are getting worse

That’s why we launched our thirty-second risk-checker. Last month, with your help, we advised over 60,000 men at higher risk to speak to their doctor. This is a great achievement, but it’s now crucial that we reach more black men. 

We need to help black men at higher risk to speak to their doctor, and we need to help scientists understand how genes influence risk factors so we can find better ways to diagnose and treat prostate cancer. Here’s what you can do to help right now:

 

A new study to understand why black men are at higher risk.

If you are a man of African or Caribbean descent aged 40-69 and haven’t had prostate cancer, you may be suitable to take part in a study that can help us understand more about the genetics of prostate cancer.

The new study called PROFILE aims to understand if knowing more about the genetic changes involved can help improve prostate cancer screening for men with a higher risk of the disease. 

By taking part in this study, you’ll help us understand why some men have a higher risk of prostate cancer, to help save and extend the lives of the next generation of black men. You’ll also receive regular tests for prostate cancer, which may benefit your long-term health if you are at higher risk for the disease. 

Interested? Find out more about the PROFILE study.

Luke Williams had his prostate removed at just 49

“I was diagnosed with the disease at 49 and my dad and uncle were both diagnosed, plus I have three brothers who all have an increased risk of prostate cancer.”

“To an extent, I was lucky. My initial GP missed that fact that I had prostate cancer twice and when I was due to have another full ‘MOT check-up’, including a PSA test, I went with a new GP who paid attention. Six weeks later I was told I had prostate cancer. I was so grateful to my new GP who detected the disease at an early stage that I showered them with gifts.”

“I had successful surgery to remove the prostate and despite suffering from side-effects of the procedure, overall, I was happy with my treatment journey. However, I understand that for many men this isn’t always the case.”

“I hope men of African or Caribbean descent will consider being part of this study. Not only could regular testing help spot early signs of prostate cancer, but the research they’re supporting could help all black men in the future.”

Phil Kissi was diagnosed in 2006 after watching a TV programme that mentioned African and Caribbean men are at higher risk.

“It’s terrifying to think that I could so easily have carried on without knowing anything about prostate cancer even though it’s now the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the UK. Luckily my GP was very supportive when I raised my concerns with him and I caught the cancer in time to have successful treatment, but it saddens me to think that others may not have this chance.”

“I didn't have any symptoms but I knew a couple of test results were a bit concerning. I had a biopsy and it turned out I had early stage, aggressive prostate cancer.”

Take the 30 second online risk check. It’s quick, easy and could save your life.”

Karen Bonner lost her Dad to prostate cancer 

“My whole family and I want to do what we can to help save men's lives and encourage men to understand their risk. My Dad was aware that as a black man in his 70's, he had an increased risk of getting prostate cancer, but unfortunately this is not the case for so many other men. The sooner you take those first steps to find out more, the better.” 

Share our risk-checker to help black men at higher risk to speak to their doctor.

Share our study to understand why black men are at higher risk to help find participants.

comments powered by Disqus