Ian Robb left Prostate Cancer UK a Gift in his Will

Meet Ian

Ian Robb was a long-term Prostate Cancer UK supporter and volunteer. Diagnosed in March 2009, he sadly passed away from advanced prostate cancer in September 2014.

When we spoke to Ian back in 2013, he freely admitted that he knew very little about prostate cancer before his diagnosis. Like the majority of men, symptoms such as visiting the toilet more frequently and back pain were pushed to the side and attributed to simply being over 50.

Ian Robb

"I was shocked and stunned."

Eventually, Ian, who was 55 years old at the time, made an appointment with his doctor. Upon recalling the experience, Ian said: “My doctor immediately referred me to the Royal Infirmary. After tests and examinations, they confirmed that I had prostate cancer. I was shocked and stunned. To suddenly be in hospital that same evening to be told I had advanced prostate cancer that was potentially beyond treatment and secondary cancer which had reached my spine, hence the back pain was devastating.”

Ian, who is survived by his wife Diane told us: “You instantly think about your loved ones and not being there for them in the future. My wife and I had just ordered a new suite for the conservatory and I remember thinking ‘would I still be here to see the delivery in six months’ time?’

I try to live my life with the same attitude as I did the day before I had cancer.

After around ten days in hospital, Ian was discharged and had been receiving hormone treatment injections every three months to control the PSA count. Currently there is no treatment available to cure advanced prostate cancer, only to control it. Throughout his treatment, Ian remained positive, commenting “I try to live my life with the same attitude as I did the day before I had cancer.”

“My message to men is don’t ignore the signs until it’s too late like I did. Be aware of the existence of prostate cancer and consult your doctor if you have any worries or symptoms arise. It can be successfully treated if identified early.”

When Ian passed away in September 2014 he was determined that other men would benefit from his story by being aware of the symptoms to look out for so that they stand the best possible chance of being diagnosed early.

"He was determined that other men would benefit from his story"

When Ian passed away in September 2014 he was determined that other men would benefit from his story by being aware of the symptoms to look out for so that they stand the best possible chance of being diagnosed early.

Ian was so passionate about the work of Prostate Cancer UK; he decided to leave more than just his incredible story as his legacy. He left us a gift in his Will too.

Thanks to Ian’s amazing support, we will be able to continue our work protecting future generations of men and their families in his honour.