Alice was diagnosed with an enlarged prostate and prostate cancer before she transitioned.

I was peeing frequently and was told I had an enlarged prostate. A few years later, I had a biopsy that showed that I had cancer. 
 
When I was diagnosed, I thought, ‘Great, take the lot away’, until I quickly learnt that the prostate remains after genital reconstructive surgery. At this time, no one treating me for prostate cancer was aware of my gender dysphoria. 

 

When I was diagnosed, I thought, ‘Great, take the lot away’, until I quickly learnt that the prostate remains after genital reconstructive surgery.

 
Overall, my experience is that no one who has spoken with me – urologists, GPs or gender specialists at the gender identity clinic – have indicated that they are aware of any specific issues required for a trans woman with prostate cancer. In the end, I had to suggest that my urologist was contacted by the gender identity clinic staff as the urologists were treating me as a male, not as a trans woman.
 
I am currently following the standard 'wait and see' (active surveillance) treatment programme and have my bloods tested every three months for my PSA score. I’ve been told that PSA is a poor indicator, especially for trans women, as finasteride and oestrogen patches will tend to depress PSA levels. So, I feel that I am in a vacuum of sorts.
 
A recommendation from my experience is that earlier exchange of information between the gender identity clinic, GP and urologists would have been good, so that everyone would be treating me as a whole person.