London to Amsterdam 2015

Get your mates together and represent your club in Europe this summer.

Former players, managers, staff and fans from across the Football League all club together to beat prostate cancer.

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Latest news

Latest news

As the Football League's official charity partner, we work with some of the web's finest football writers to bring you some of the best football stories around.

We also do a fair bit of reporting ourselves. Read the stories below to see how the partnership with football is helping us beat prostate cancer.

 

Featured article

A short, back and Scholes

8 Aug 2014

Supporting our campaign at his local barbers in Oldham, Scholes joined Rugby League stars Kevin Sinfield and Mark Flanagan for a short back and sides in the place they have been having a trim for years.

Read all our football stories
About our partnership

About our partnership

We need you on our team!

This season we want millions of football fans, thousands of players, and 72 football mad communities to put aside their rivalries on the pitch and join Men United. Prostate cancer kills one man every hour. That's a strike rate of 10,000 men a year. As the Official Charity Partner of The Football League we believe we can win our most important game of the season. Men United v Prostate Cancer.

Prostate Cancer UK crowd pic

WHAT WE DO

We fight to help more men survive and enjoy a better quality of life

  • Support men with prostate cancer and provide information about the disease
  • Find answers by funding research into better tests and treatments
  • Lead change by campaigning and collaborating to improve standards of care.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

Sign up to receive our regular Men United email newsletter and you'll get:

  • Regular features from the web's finest football writers
  • Exclusive interviews with our ambassadors
  • News about how we are making a difference in the football community
  • Information about unique events and opportunities to get involved with your club.

Men United v Prostate Cancer. Together we can win this.

Hall of fame
  • David Annand

    Walked 500 miles

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    David Annand

    Walked 500 miles

    David was diagnosed with prostate cancer at the age of 49. Like many others, he thought only 'old men' get prostate cancer and was shocked that he had no symptoms. To raise awareness of the disease among men over the age of 40, David set out to walk 500 miles, mainly around the perimeter of sporting and football grounds where men gather to watch sport. His campaign to highlight just how common prostate cancer is and to encourage men of all ages to be aware of the benefits of adopting a healthy diet and lifestyle has taken him to football grounds across the country and finished at Wembley for the Championship playoff final. He reached over 500,000 spectators and raised over £5,000 in the process.
  • H’Angus the Monkey

    Super mascot

    Hartlepool United Football Club's much loved mascot, H'Angus the Monkey, donated £2,500 to Prostate Cancer UK from cash raised from a recent fundraising walk. Kicking off at Pools' training ground in Durham the 18 mile trek ended at their home ground, Victoria Park, to the cheers of fans. 
  • Rowan Staszkiewicz

    Running Forest fan

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    Rowan Staszkiewicz

    Running Forest fan

    Meet Rowan Staszkiewicz, 27 - Forest fan, computer game player, hot chocolate lover, and serial road runner who raised money for Prostate Cancer UK by running to Nottingham Forest away games. Rowan has eaten up over 200 miles between Nottingham and Peterborough, Leicester, Derby, Birmingham and Sheffield. He also road in The Football League charity challenge London to Amsterdam at the end of the season. Rowan has raised over £3,000 for Prostate Cancer UK.
  • Kevin Megson

    Charity ambassador

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    Kevin Megson

    Charity ambassador

    In 2006, Kevin Megson, then 49, was in hospital having a viral infection investigated, although he was otherwise fit and healthy. As part of this, Kevin was given a PSA blood test to rule out any prostate problems. The result came back to show that Kevin's PSA level was raised for a man of his age, which the doctors knew needed further investigation. Further tests, examinations and biopsies confirmed that Kevin had locally advanced prostate cancer. Kevin says he could hardly believe the result - he thought prostate cancer was just an old man's disease. Watch Kevin's story on our website. Since being diagnosed seven years ago, he and his wife Sue have raised an average of £20,000 every year for Prostate Cancer UK. As an ambassador of the charity and keen Leeds United fan, during the 2012/13 season Kevin volunteered at numerous Football League games to raise money, spoke to his local media and received a £50,000 donation from Capital One on the charity's behalf at Elland Road. At the npower League 1 Play Off Final in May 2013 Kevin represented the charity on the day as our Guest of Honour and met both teams on the pitch before the game. Kevin and Sue were both a shoe in for the Men United Hall of Fame. While raising £20,000 a year might be beyond you, what is it that you can do to show your support for the cause and really get your name on the team sheet?          
  • Jeff Stelling

    Football Ambassador

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    Jeff Stelling

    Football Ambassador

    Every football fans favourite Saturday afternoon companion, Jeff Stelling, joins the Men United Hall of Fame for regularly showcasing our activity on his Gillette Soccer Saturday programme and for a fantastic interview he gave us to round up the 2012/13 season. Jeff will be supporting #MenUnited this season, why don't you?
  • Mark Bright

    Football Ambassador

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    Mark Bright

    Football Ambassador

    With ex-Palace and Wednesday star turned pundit, Mark Bright, it's almost easier to list what he hasn't done for us rather than what he has as it's a shorter list. As one of our first Football Ambassadors to sign up, Mark promoted our 'Road to Wembley' competition last season both on talkSPORT and twitter. He also appeared on talkSPORT to talk about prostate cancer and to promote our London to Amsterdam Challenge. And that was just the start. Mark stars in our spoof betting TV adverts alongside Jon Culshaw and another Prostate Cancer UK legend, Tommy Walsh. The adverts are played on Sky Sports during the season. He regularly re-tweets about our campaigns, attends and speaks at events on behalf of the charity and makes sure his network of famous footballers and sports pundits are doing their bit too.
  • Luther Blissett

    Football Ambassador

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    Luther Blissett

    Football Ambassador

    Former England, AC Milan, Watford and Bournemouth star Luther Blissett more than earned his place in the Men United Hall of Fame last season. He launched our 2012/13 season with fellow Hall of Fame member, David Annand, before taking up the saddle to ride to the home of Total Football on our London to Amsterdam Challenge. To promote the ride he was interviewed by Tubes on Soccer AM, gave numerous interviews to the national and regional press as well as chatting to Adrian Durham and Darren Gough on talkSPORT before (and during) the ride. Not only that, Luther has signed up for our 2013/2014 London to Amsterdam Challenge (6-8 June 2014). And we hope at the celebration dinner for the ride his Bob Marley medley is just as good this year!
  • Les Ferdinand

    Football Ambassador

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    Les Ferdinand

    Football Ambassador

    Former England, Newcastle and Tottenham legend Les Ferdinand signed up to Men United as his family has been affected by the disease. Les said: "Having lost my granddad to prostate cancer, I am keen to add my voice to the movement fighting it. Men are getting more health conscious, but there is still plenty of room for more awareness about prostate cancer, which kills a staggering one man every hour." As a number 9 himself at various times in his career Les backed our award winning #bestno9s campaign as well as our fan competition 'Road to Wembley' last season. He also backed our Abiraterone campagin in the wake of losing his grandfather to the disease. Towards the end of the season 'Sir Les' supported friend and Men United Hall of Fame star Luther Blissett on the London to Amsterdam Challenge.
  • Ray Clemence MBE

    Football Ambassador

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    Ray Clemence MBE

    Football Ambassador

    Former England goal keeper and now England coach Ray Clemence  was the face of the charity's new magazine, Progress, last season. He has supported our London to Amsterdam Challenge with an interview for match day programmes and by writing to all 72 managers around The Football League to encourage people to sign up for the ride. Ray was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2005 after a conversation with the England physio. "I didn't think there was anything wrong but I mentioned that I wasn't able to pee at my normal speed and I never really felt that I'd emptied my bladder properly. He suggested I should get it checked out and, fortunately, I took his advice. My treatment was successful and for three or four years I had no problems. Unfortunately at a check-up in November 2012 I discovered that the cancer had returned. I have now finished the course of chemotherapy and although still on medication I am now officially in remission which is fantastic news for me and the family. I've always been a positive person. When you give in to something it will win and you can't do that. Men don't like to think that anything is wrong with them, especially sportsmen, and if you have a slight problem 'down there' it will never be at the forefront of your mind that it could be cancer. We all, that's men I mean, need to know we are more at risk when we hit 50, if we have a father, brother or uncle who has had the disease and if we are African Caribbean. Now I'm supporting Prostate Cancer UK's partnership with The Football League to make sure that everyone connected to football - the players, the fans, the staff and the managers - knows about prostate cancer."
  • Scott McLachlan

    Walkthe92

    Pompey fan Scott did something very special last season. He gave up his job and decided to walk to every single football club in England and Wales last season. Yes, that's 92 football clubs over 8 months clocking up 2,300 miles and raising over £7,500 to support men living with prostate cancer. Keeping us updated by email and social media Scott raised the profile of Prostate Cancer UK in football for the whole season by completing this amazing feat. Have you got what it takes to join Men United? Don't worry you don't have to give up your job or walk 2,300 miles. Have a look at what events you can do.
  • David Broadbent

    Running the Virgin London Marathon

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    David Broadbent

    Running the Virgin London Marathon

    Oldham Athletic's Commercial and Marketing guru, David Broadbent is going to be a tough one to beat for other Football League club employees looking to enter the Men United Hall of Fame. At the start of the 2012/13 season David, and the Latics CEO, Simon Corney, approached us about sponsoring the back of Oldham's home and away shirts to help raise awareness of a disease that had affected two of Oldham's directors in the past. What they didn't tell us about was how the Latics were going to end up on TV in not just the FA Cup 4th round against Liverpool, but also two games against Everton in the 5th round. Twitter went crazy for a bit of Prostate Cancer UK action on Oldham's shirts last season. If that wasn't enough David arranged for us to hold two bucket shakes at Football League matches during the season raising over £800 and he signed up to run the 2012 Virgin London Marathon raising over £2,700. We're about to auction off last season's shirts too. So Football League club employees, what are you waiting for? Get involved like David did and join the Men United Hall of Fame before someone else beats you to it.
  • Errol McKellar

    MOTs, money & match day programmes

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    Errol McKellar

    MOTs, money & match day programmes

    Errol McKellar has supported Prostate Action now Prostate Cancer UK since 2010 after being diagnosed himself after he saw a pamphlet in his local area.  As a Leyton Orient youth coach, Errol is also a bit of legend in the London Borough of Hackney for his services to young people, youth football and Leyton Orient. His work was recognised last year as he became one of the official Olympic torch bearers for the 2012 Olympic games. Last season, fellow Hall of Fame squad member Leon McSweeney interviewed Errol for the Leyton Orient website and programme about his career and his battle with prostate cancer. A story in a programme can go a long way in helping us reach at risk men who follow their local football team. However, Errol also offers a discount on MOTs at the garage he's run for the last 20 years to those same men if they agree to go to the doctor and ask about prostate cancer. That alone is worthy of a Hall of Fame entry. If you have been affected by prostate cancer or want to set up a similar MOT referral system why don't you get in touch?
  • Leon McSweeney

    Footballer enters the Nutcracker Suite

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    Leon McSweeney

    Footballer enters the Nutcracker Suite

    Last season Leon McSweeney played for Leyton Orient in The Football League. He also signed for Men United, a small yet growing team of star players willing to do what they can to fight a killer disease. In January 2013, Leon took time out from his career to support our Sledgehammer Fund as we woke up the nation to a disease that kills one man every hour. While Bill Bailey made sure everyone knew about it through their television sets, many of our supporters entered the 'Nutcracker Suite' to smash walnuts in return for a donation to Prostate Cancer UK. A walnut is roughly the same size and shape as the prostate. And we needed one enormous sledgehammer to help us to crack it. We haven't cracked it yet but Leon and thousands of others started it off in a shop in Holborn, in central London last January. Leon also writes a blog about being a footballer and has written a fantastic piece about Errol McKellar, another Men United Hall of Fame squad member following an interview / video he made with Errol about his life, work and fight against prostate cancer. As you can see we're building a strong squad, do your bit and you too can join a team that aims to smash the opposition.
  • Jade Cole

    Going above and beyond for the cause

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    Jade Cole

    Going above and beyond for the cause

    Jade Cole, PR Manager at Ipswich Town, was one of our stars of last season. Customer service, patience and efficiency is her middle name. It's not, but it should be. Although that would fly in the face of middle naming traditions and we can't have that. Needless to say Jade was a superb help last season. Fellow Men United Hall of Fame squad member, David Annand and Mrs Annand were particularly well looked after when David visited Portman Road as part of his 500 mile awareness walk around Football League grounds last season.  Jade also helped co-ordinate a successful bucket shake on the same day and ensured that an Ipswich Town fan was able to donate a £150 check after raising money for Prostate Cancer UK. Jade also ensured that all of our campaigns last year were promoted to the Ipswich faithful whether that be our #bestno9s campaign, our Road to Wembley ticket competition or placing our hard hitting adverts into the #ITFC match day programmes. This season Jade has already helped ensure that Ipswich legend - Mick Mills - has made the short list into our Football League's greatest captain campaign and is working with people in the community who are supporting the cause. If there were more Jade Coles knocking around our job would be a lot easier.  
  • Mark Crossley

    Blogging & podcasting

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    Mark Crossley

    Blogging & podcasting

    Mark Crossley is one of our Football League bloggers. The Bury FC one to be specific. Last season Mark contributed to our #bestno9s campaign and this season he provided 100 words on why Chris Lucketti should be nominated the greatest captain of The Football League. Unfortunately for Mark and Bury fans, Chris didn't make our short list. This, however, has not stopped Mark from becoming one of our flagship bloggers by interviewing fellow Hall of Fame member, Sky Sports pundit and former footballer, Don Goodman for his Football League ' We are going up' podcast. If you, like Mark, have access to lots of football fans digitally or otherwise we'd love to hear from you.  
  • Don Goodman

    Football Ambassador

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    Don Goodman

    Football Ambassador

    Ex-Bradford, West Brom, Sunderland and Wolves (to name a few...) striker Don Goodman became a Prostate Cancer UK Football Ambassador at the start of last season. Like Sky Sports' Jeff Stelling, he provided his predictions for last season but the less said about them the better!  This season Don is back with a bang and has already provided the 'We are going up' podcast with an excellent interview you should all listen too. If you'd like to join Don, Jeff and a host of other stars from The Football League this season then sign up and do your bit for mankind this season.
  • Brian Kilgannon

    Fight before it's too late

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    Brian Kilgannon

    Fight before it's too late

    Brian and his family decided to share their story after reading about our partnership with Millwall FC. We have worked with Brian to ensure that his message goes far and wide across the football community. Read on for Brian's story in his own words: "As a true Millwall fan, I know the club's motto - 'we fear no foe'.  Do yourself a favour and don't turn the page. Reading this could save your life. Several generations of my family have supported Millwall, both home and away, through the ups and downs. However, nothing compares to my battle against prostate cancer. I am a 49-year-old man, born and bred in New Cross.  I am a husband, dad, son, brother and uncle. On 27 July 2012 I was diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer.  I thought I was strong. I thought it could be controlled and treated, but I left it too long. The cancer has spread to the bone and now my 'foe' is gradually taking over my life. By the time I went to the GP, I knew something was wrong, but I kept saying 'I am strong, I can fight the pain - it will go away.' Ignoring the symptoms was the worst thing I could do. Men are the worse. We don't go to the doctors. We don't confide in others.  I had the symptoms - severe pain in my hip, not having full flow, not hitting the back of the pan when having a pee - but I did nothing and unknowingly allowed it to spread. I told myself that prostate cancer is an old man's disease and for that reason I couldn't possibly have it. I am living proof that this is a lie - I am young. Don't be put off if you are told you are too young. Only you know your body. Insist on a simple blood PSA test and save your life.  Not a moment of the day goes by when I don't think of my foe. I am constantly reminded of its presence by the pain. Well done Millwall, for standing up and being counted by supporting Prostate Cancer UK. We see it happening to other people and never think that it can happen to us. If you have any symptoms, confide in a loved one. Act now. Don't leave it too late. Don't fear your foe. Fight it before it's too late." If you have a story to tell or want to help keep spreading the message, get in touch, like Brian did as we can help.
  • Billy Bremner

    Captain of Men United

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    Billy Bremner

    Captain of Men United

    To celebrate Bremner's great leadership, we've inducted him into the Men United Hall Of Fame as the captain of our team. We asked David Wilkinson of Leeds fan site The Scratching Shed - who originally nominated Bremner - why the firebrand midfielder is such a great choice. "Bremner had a sign above his peg in the dressing room that said 'Keep fighting'," said David. "That summed him up - he put his body on the line for his team-mates. As the song goes: 'For the sake of Leeds United he would break himself in two.' "Leeds fans need no convincing of the great man's genius, but it's fantastic to see wider recognition of his talents. Billy Bremner is the perfect leader for Men United." Click here to read David's original tribute to Billy. And here's why football writer Jonathan Wilson rates Bremner as one of the greatest skippers in Football League history.    
  • Paul Robinson

    Millwall legend

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    Paul Robinson

    Millwall legend

    Paul Robinson made our greatest captain in Football League history top 5 and therefore goes automatically into our Hall of Fame. However, he's in there because he attended the launch of Millwall's 2013/14 Prostate Cancer UK kit launch, for promoting our campaigns on twitter, for committing to do Movember and contributing to our Men United e-newsletter. But he's also in our Hall of Fame because he says things like this, delivered in those frantic seconds after the referee has sounded the bell to summon the players: "We're playing for the people who hate their jobs, who'd love our lives. Let's give them something special." Click here to read what our Millwall blogger said about Robbo, and why Mike Calvin rates him as Millwall's greatest captain of all time. We hope Robbo inspires you to join our Hall of Fame.
  • Mick Mills MBE

    Ipswich & England legend

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    Mick Mills MBE

    Ipswich & England legend

    Mick Mills made our top 5 greatest captains of The Football League so he's straight into our Men United Hall of Fame. But Mick has also provided with quotes to support our campaign and has written to all the Ipswich fans to thank them for their support. And we hope to work with Mick across the season. In the words of John Cross from the Daily Mirror, this is why Mick is in the Hall of Fame: "Humble and quietly spoken, Mills had a terrific attitude. There was no ego, just a desire to win. He was also well-behaved on and off the pitch. Instantly recognisable thanks to his famous moustache, Mills was a cornerstone of Bobby Robson's successful Ipswich team. They won the FA Cup, Uefa Cup and only finished outside of the top six once in 10 seasons. It is a remarkable record, and one that owed much to Mills and his leadership as one of English football's great captains. Any player could look to him and see him fierce in the tackle, ambitious on the ball and always ready to help his team-mates. A perfect captain." To read the rest of John Cross' feature on Mick click here.
  • Eddie Gray

    Supporting Men United

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    Eddie Gray

    Supporting Men United

    Eddie Gray took time out of his schedule to meet Colin Taylor, Prostate Cancer UK ambassador, to accept the honour the Leeds fans bestowed on Billy Bremner as captain of Men United. Eddie and Colin's presence was able to secure a feature in the Yorkshire Post with quotes about his former team mate: "The club was his life. He lived for Leeds United and he was an inspiration. "He had a great record of coming up with big goals in big games and it says a lot that Don chose him to replace Bobby Collins as captain. You had big Jack Charlton at Leeds, a World Cup winner. But Billy was the one." Here's the full article in the Yorkshire Post as part of a two page spread on Bremner.
  • Alan Williams

    Title sponsorship

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    Alan Williams

    Title sponsorship

    Alan Williams is the Commercial Director at Millwall FC.  We thought we better enter Alan into the Men United Hall of Fame as soon as we met him. Why? Because Alan and the management team at Millwall decided to donate their shirt sponsorship to Prostate Cancer UK for the 2013/14 season. As well as having the best looking kit in the Championship, Millwall are helping raise awareness of the cause and the work of the organisation to thousands of fans not just at the Den but across The Football League.  After seeing the annoucement about the partnership life-long Millwall fan Brian Kilgannon, and his family, came forward to share their own prostate cancer story. We hope more Lions fans come forward and share their story, use our services, spread the word and raise money. If you are a Millwall fan and you meet Alan. Buy him a pint. If you are in charge of shirt sponsorship at your club and want to do something special then youcan join Alan in the Men United Hall of Fame too.   
  • Geoff Douglass

    Geoff Douglass

    Volunteer extraordinaire

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    Geoff Douglass

    Geoff Douglass

    Volunteer extraordinaire

    Geoff Douglass joins the Men United Hall of Fame for his unwaning enthusiasm, support and commitment to the cause. And because he's got some great jokes too. He's that good at raising money at football matches we've got him to write up his top tips to help future fundraisers fill their full bucket after 90 minutes. It's not just at football matches where Geoff raises money, through his local golf club and at his old work place are just two examples. He's also works tirelessly to ensure many men realise how common prostate cancer is. Geoff also supports the charity by coming in to Head Office once a week to support our work. From photographing football shirts to keeping track of the web stats to tracking down players and managers on Twitter, Geoff's help has been enormously helpful for many years now. As has his lemon drizzle cake which keeps us all going mid morning! Without Geoff the charity wouldn't be able to do what it does. We need more people like Geoff to join our squad. So, what are you waiting for?  
  • Nat Lofthouse

    Bolton legend

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    Nat Lofthouse

    Bolton legend

    Nat Lofthouse made our top 5 greatest captains of The Football League so he's straight into our Men United Hall of Fame joining Billy Bremner, Mick Mills, Paul Robinson, and Archie Gibson (as well as a number of other famous faces). The Guardian's Scott Murray backed Lofthouse for the Men United captaincy with his artcile on the top 5 reasons why Nat should be our captain. Here's one of them and you can read more about Nat Lofthouse in the full feature by Scott. A local hero who kept it real Lofthouse lost the early part of his career to the war, and, having retired in 1960, missed out on the abolition of the maximum wage by a year. Yet he always considered himself a lucky man: fortunate that his £10 per-week wage was quadruple that of his dad, who bagged coal for the Co-op, and fortunate that he was able to escape a life down the mines, where he worked for four years as a Bevin Boy. Never arrogant or flashy, he could still be seen on the bus when he was winning England caps and FA Cups, a genuine modesty that endeared him to the fans. You can also read about what our Football League bloggers Geoff Moss and Chris Parr from The Men in White thought about their hero too here.

  • Archie Gibson

    Scunthorpe United legend

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    Archie Gibson

    Scunthorpe United legend

    Archie Gibson made our top 5 greatest captains of The Football League so he's straight into our Men United Hall of Fame joining Billy Bremner, Mick Mills, Paul Robinson, and Nat Lofthouse (as well as a number of other famous faces). Footballer turned journalist Adrian Clarke backed Gibson for the Men United captaincy with his artcile on the top 5 reasons why Archie should be our captain. Here's one of them and you can read more about Archie Gibson in the  full feature by Adrain Clarke. Going above and beyond Modern-day players don't know they're born. Back in the early 60s, the world was in the midst of the Cold War, and this led to unease over public safety in some areas of Britain. Seizing the initiative, Gibson volunteered to be part of Scunthorpe's Civil Defence Division in 1962. His plan was to train the Iron squad into a rescue team, should they be needed in an emergency. He'd also be on permanent standby just in case a local disaster occurred. How's that for dedication? No wonder he's such a popular figure in the north Lincolnshire town. To read why Archie's grandson, and author of Any Old Iron, felt his grandad was the great captain in Iron's history click here.
  • John Heyworth

    Football volunteer leader

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    John Heyworth

    Football volunteer leader

    As well as being a Burnley fan, John is a volunteer leader for our Prostate Cancer UK match days in The Football League. He is spreading the word to ensure more football fans are aware of the issues they may be faced with at some point in their lives.  This is John's story: "I was diagnosed with prostate cancer at the age of 59 but my cancer journey started some 10 years before that. I had a real problem with ‘peeing’. My issue was frequency, I needed to go at least every hour. I went to my GP many times only to be told I was too young for it to be prostate cancer and there was nothing that could be done for me. I was a senior manager at work and it was very embarrassing having to leave meetings to dash to the loo! Eventually, I insisted that I be tested and bingo…I had prostate cancer. After a couple of scans it was thought the cancer was contained within the prostate so I decided to have it removed. It was a long operation, seven hours, and a tad uncomfortable for a few days afterwards. After a couple of weeks I was back to normal and soon able to go to the gym and do distance running, one of my passions. I saw a link to Prostate Cancer UK on my football club’s web site, Burnley FC, and decided I wanted to do something positive to raise awareness and help people who may be experiencing what I went through. I decided to become a volunteer. Initially I wanted to do Peer Support and Awareness. I was trained by the charity in both and now feel competent to talk to anyone about prostate cancer. I have also taken part in bucket collections at four football grounds. I ran the Manchester 10k to raise money and more recently I have been campaigning for the charity at the Party Conferences. I had three very interesting days at the Lib Dem conference in Glasgow where I met many MP’s, MSP’s and MEP’s and was able to inform them and seek their support for Prostate Cancer UK's Quality Checklist. I even got to play table football with Vince Cable, who beat me 3-1…well, when campaigning, you want them to feel good! I am now retired with lots of time to spare so I have expanded my voluntary role by becoming involved in a major initiative to help the 280,000 survivors of prostate cancer. The project is managed by the charity and involves a series of work-streams lead by some of the country’s top clinicians and academics. I find this intellectually stimulating and hopefully after a couple of years of trials the initiatives will be launched nationally and globally to the benefit of survivors."
  • Paul Dews

    Head of Media, Leeds United

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    Paul Dews

    Head of Media, Leeds United

    Paul Dews, Head of Media and Publications at Leeds United Football Club, take a bow. Paul is our Men United Hall of Fame Football League employee for September. It's a mouthful but it's a well deserved award! He has been inducted into our Men United Hall of Fame for his outstanding support for men with prostate cancer and for championing the work of the leading UK charity in the fight against the disease. Paul joins the Hall of Fame for his individual support for Prostate Cancer UK’s ‘Greatest captain in the history of The Football League’ campaign in which Leeds United legend, Billy Bremner, was revealed as the all-time greatest captain earlier this season. Our very own Mark Bishop, Director of Fundraising, said: "On behalf of everyone at Prostate Cancer UK, we would like to congratulate Paul Dews on his induction into the Men United Hall of Fame for his contribution in the fight against prostate cancer, the most common cancer in men. Paul helped to ensure our recent campaign was promoted to the Leeds United faithful by publishing articles and by helping to engage United’s legends with our work to help raise awareness of the disease." Men United will be recruiting Football League employees to our Hall of Fame every month to highlight the success and good work of those individuals across our football communities, who take action and help put the spotlight on this killer disease. How can I join? Have a read... For those wishing to enter the Men United Hall of Fame and to register for a regular football newsletter featuring some of the finest writing on the web, as well as unique access to news and events across The Football League, visit prostatecanceruk.org/football Sign up today to be in with the chance to win a pair of tickets to the Capital One Cup Final.
  • Jeff Mostyn

    Runs in honour of John Bond

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    Jeff Mostyn

    Runs in honour of John Bond

    AFC Bournemouth chairman Jeff Mostyn completed the Bupa Great South Run as a tribute to former Manchester City and Norwich City manager John Bond. Mostyn raised over £1,000 for Prostate Cancer UK, this season’s Official Charity Partner of The Football League as he completed the ten-mile run in Portsmouth on Sunday 27 October 2013.
  • Steve Greenwood

    Volunteer

    Leeds fan Steve Greenwood joins the Men United Hall of Fame for his work supporting the charity in a number of ways. With a personal connection to the cause through a close friend, Steve is raising money for Prostate Cancer UK having recently organised a charity football match. He's also been supporting our Men United match days by collecting money on the day at Loftus Road and Broadhall Way, signing up a range of Football League faces to Men United as well as reporting on games via social media. Here's a little bit of what he's been up to:  
  • Bridie

    Bridie Heath

    Volunteer Leader

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    Bridie Heath

    Bridie

    Volunteer Leader

    Here's to yet another amazing volunteer who has not only collected thousands of pounds for us but has agreed to share her story: "None of the risk factors for prostate cancer applied to my husband.  He was a fit 51 year old and our 2 children were still in primary school.  The cancer already advanced, his prognosis was not good but that was late 2005. He put up a good fight." I’m a Rotherham United football supporter, write for the fanzine and post on Millersmad, a fans forum.  Being a woman, and able to hold my own in the male dominated football world, I was happy to see the Football League adopt Prostate Cancer UK as it’s chosen charity and used every opportunity to remind my fellow (male) supporters to take their heads out of the sand and look after their health. When the first bucket collections were muted I signed up, and then became Volunteer Leader.  I’ve since collected at the League 2 playoff final, at Blackburn, Bradford and led the collection at Rotherham again this year.  I continue to annoy my fellow football supporters and blog in the fanzine.  The 6 games I’ve collected at total nearly £7,000, of which I’m only a small part but I’m already signed up to a couple more this season and have enrolled for speaker training over the summer."
  • Andy Clarke

    Andy Clarke

    Volunteer

    Just months after learning that his father had prostate cancer, Andy Clarke was delivered the same news.  Due to his early diagnosis, and after months of treatment, he is now free of the disease and an active supporter of Prostate Cancer UK. His support is unwavering as he helps raise funds and awareness of prostate cancer.   He’s a regular on the Great North Run and has raised over £2000 for us over the years.    He’s trained to give talks on prostate cancer and speaks at many events on our behalf (you may have seen him at the Blackpool Pigeon Show recently).  He’s also a big supporter of our campaigns. If his personal story doesn’t inspire you to leave a gift in your will or volunteer at a football match, then we don’t know what will.    Andy, who coaches a local school football team, combines his love of the game with fundraising. He's joined our army of volunteers collecting donations from fans.  “The feeling as I made my way to this game was one that I’ve never experienced before. Yes, there was the same nervous excitement that there always is but this match was different, I wasn’t just going as a fan but also as an ambassador for Prostate Cancer UK.”   We really appreciate the hard work and dedication of volunteers like Andy, who give up their time to help raise funds and awareness.  So why not join Andy and sign up to collect at one of our football matches? You also get a free ticket to watch the match afterwards! We all have a lot to learn from Andy but here’s your take home message - You are two and a half more times as likely to get prostate cancer if your father or brother has been diagnosed. So get yourself checked. It could save your life. 
  • Roland Powell

    Roland

    Volunteer

    Roland didn’t set out to become a hero, but he is one. We’re proud to have him in our Hall of Fame as he is a solid supporter of Men United, and has raised a tremendous amount of awareness of prostate cancer among motorbike enthusiasts in the UK. His wonderful support to us includes collecting at football matches, giving a talk on our behalf and collecting fundraising cheques. His most notable contribution to the cause however, has been down to his passion for motorbike riding and his involvement with motorcycle organisations. There’s not a lot that would keep Roland off the roads, but he was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2009 which meant he was MIA as he went through radiotherapy. His treatment forced him to resign as Yorkshire Secretary of the BMW Club  and from the position of Yorkshire Representative of Royal British Legion Riders Branch. After being questioned about his actions, he publicised his news online to both clubs, a combined membership of over 9000 people and importantly, male dominated.  Roland found himself flooded with questions and became the go-to guy for all things prostate related. He encouraged many of his fellow bikers, especially those at risk (those who are over 50) to visit their GPs and get themselves checked. Thanks to Roland, some men’s lives have been saved. Well done Roland. We salute you!
  • William Kilgannon

    Reporter, photographer, fundraiser, TV star

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    William Kilgannon

    Reporter, photographer, fundraiser, TV star

    William Kilgannon is 11 years old, he's a super keen Millwall fan and a massive supporter of Prostate Cancer UK. And he's an absolute shoe-in for the Men United Hall of Fame. William has been working with us since his dad, Brian Kilgannon, contacted the charity after hearing of Millwall's involvement with Prostate Cancer UK last July (Summer 2013). Brian is living with prostate cancer and is doing all he can with his family (wife Loretta and son William) to raise the profile of the disease. And Kilgannon junior has more than picked up the batton. From proudly sporting the 'Man of Men' badge wherever he goes, to collecting 10,000 pennies as part of Prostate Cancer UK's 10,000 challenge, to selling pin badges to capturing match day moments on his camera for us. He's ramping it up for Men United. For anyone in the know Millwall cut it pretty fine again this season, avoiding relegation on the final day of the season to maintain their Football League Championship status. Don't worry if you missed the nail biting conclusion of the season our Men United reported Kilgannon was on hand to report all the action. Before following up with a review of the QPR v Derby County play off final too. And that's not all. William is undertaking another 10,000 challenge (this time with mixed coins) and he's set to star on the BBC this Father's Day (Sunday 15 June). If you are reading this and thinking 'I'd like to be in the Men United Hall of Fame' you are going to have do something a bit special to beat William's entry. So you better get cracking.
  • Mark Vosper

    Going the extra mile

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    Mark Vosper

    Going the extra mile

    You might say Mark Vosper goes the extra mile for Prostate Cancer UK. In fact, he often goes an extra 200 miles. Mark, an employee at Network Rail makes the most of this by travelling 100’s of miles every week to hand out leaflets and collect at football matches in various locations. Based in Merseyside, he has travelled to destinations including Fleetwood and Middlesbrough in the north and Colchester and Exeter in the south, his dedication to collecting knows no bounds. The railway played its part in the early development of the Football League with several teams locating their grounds close to stations. In the 1970s and 1980s ‘Football Specials’ were introduced which ferried fans to away games helping to boost attendances. The railways still transport teams and fans to matches around the country today so it is fitting that Mark, a passionate football fan, works for Network Rail. To collect at football games, Mark has travelled an average return journey of 166 miles return which can take 2-3 hours each way. He’s had his ups and downs along the way but in turn has experienced some of the best football this season. It’s not every day you see Kasper Schmeichel score.  His longest journey was four hours each way which he didn’t mind, but when he missed the last train home, making it back just in time for breakfast before heading off to work again- that’s when his spirits fell. This hasn’t put him off though; he’s in it for the long run. His father had prostate cancer and Mark is very grateful for the treatment and support his father received. Mark decided on a whim to sign up to collect at one game and enjoyed it so much he’s signed up for more, choosing matches based on places or grounds that he hasn’t been to before. On his travels which are the equivalent of the distance from London to New York (3492 miles), the collections have raised an amazing £12,000 from just 21 games. We’re not the only ones grateful that he’s out collecting. For Yeovil, a team that’s currently bottom of the league, he’s a lucky omen as they have remained unbeaten in all three of their games which he attended. So if you see Mark collecting at a football game, make sure you support him, he’s come a long way to get there. Thank you Mark! Your ability and willingness to travel hundreds of miles on a weekly basis for both work and for us is admirable.
  • Roy Bustin

    Volunteer

    We are thrilled to have an amazing volunteer like Roy Bustin supporting Prostate Cancer UK. He kindly agreed to share his volunteering expereince with us. "I have a general interest in health and wellbeing, and I am always looking for new opportunities to give my time.  I was looking on the Prostate Cancer UK website when I came across the bucket collection roles as part of the partnership with the Football League.  This was the perfect opportunity for me to combine two of my passions: volunteering and football!  I was keen to learn more about prostate cancer and the work of the charity and so I attended the Midlands Prostate Cancer Survivorship Conference.  At this event I was able to meet people living with prostate cancer, as well as listen to speakers discussing a range of issues affecting people with prostate cancer.  Attending this conference really hit home to me the seriousness of prostate cancer and I was inspired to get more involved with Prostate Cancer UK. My first experience of volunteering was as a Collection Volunteer at St Andrews, home of Birmingham City FC.  I signed up to by registering on the website and was soon contacted by Ewan who gave me a briefing over the phone and was able to answer any questions I had about the role.  I was also given the contacts of the Team Leader who would help to organise the volunteers on the day.  The collection itself went really well.  I was concerned initially that we wouldn’t make any money but as time went on the stadium got busier and I was surprised at just how generous people were.  After this experience I got the ‘volunteering bug’ and since then I have been lucky to be involved with collections at Wolverhampton Wanderers FC, Walsall FC and Shrewsbury FC. I have been very impressed with the professionalism and passion shown by staff and volunteers at Prostate Cancer UK and I am looking forward to working with them again in the near future." Sign up now to get involved and volunteer for us.
  • Phil Ham

    Ipswich Town blogger

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    Phil Ham

    Ipswich Town blogger

    Phil Ham is our Ipswich Town FC blogger. He writes and runs www.twtd.co.uk an #ITFC website for their fans. Phil has been a great supporter of the cause. TWTD have written a number of features for Men United. Phil's nomination for our Captain's campaign at the start of the 2013/14 season (Ipswich legend Mick Mills) made our top 5 ultimate Football League captain shortlist. More recently the Tractor Boys' blog has contributed to our 2013/14 Football League season review. Not only does Phil provide us with authentic quality football features, the TWTD website and social media feed is supported by a highly engaged readership who have supported Men United this season, and are helping to support our aim of reaching football fans with our messages through credible football spokespeople. Phil also regularly appears on 'Life's a pitch' on BBC Radio Suffolk which has played host to Lenny Paul, British bob sledder legend and Ipswich Town fan, who is a prostate cancer survivor as well as regular mentions of our work with the club. Phil is one of 72 Football League bloggers who have signed for Men United and writes about #ITFC for the Colchester Gazette. If you write about football and would like to help, get in touch with our team.
  • James McCormack

    James McCormack

    Team Leader

    We are so grateful to have James as one of our team leaders. His passion and dedication is inspiring. Thank you James for everything you've done and continue to do for us and for sharing your story here. "Collecting for Prostate Cancer UK is, for me an emotional but also a joyful, positive experience. I have collected for charity for the last fifteen years, mainly through cycle challenges. A combination of a bad bicycle accident in 2012 and a move to a different part of the country means that I am without work and able to devote a lot of time to a cause in which I believe very strongly. I have always been involved in fundraising since my early twenties, but after the death of my close friend from prostate cancer I began the association with the friendliest, most pro-active charity I have ever experienced. I was always prepared for the fact that collecting in public would take  me out of comfort zone and I love the variety of people that you meet as part of being prominent in a public place. I always, always say "Thank you", as much to the chap who gave me a tenner as to the woman who gave me the last bit of change she had in her purse. From the swaggering adolescent to the tottering child with 20p from Granny's purse, every single person has a reason for donating. Best of all fundraising puts me in contact with volunteers and public alike whom I would otherwise not have met. People who are desperate to tell their story, their experiences of prostate cancer. Often these stories are very close to my heart, as I too have lost someone precious to prostate cancer. One woman told me Prostate Cancer UK had been wonderful to her son before he died. Another said they’d helped her cope before she lost her husband less than a year ago. Often I maintain a good level of composure but I have to confess that on one occasion I didn't. A chap was speaking to one of my volunteers and I joined in the conversation. It turned out that he had been diagnosed less than a week ago. I knew of the intense pain and fear that he must be feeling . He burst into tears and so did I. I couldn’t help it. I know it's not entirely appropriate but I wished I’d given him a hug. I was, however, able to signpost him to the invaluable services and resources offered by PCUK and in doing so eased the trepidation that he was so clearly feeling. It is for this reason that given the choice between having a lazy breakfast in my deliciously warm bed or getting up early to stand in the cold with a bucket I’ll be out there – two pairs of socks, one big smile. It's for exactly the same reason that I am planning an epic cycle ride from St. Petersburg to Moscow in June 2015 to raise more money to help Prostate Cancer UK continue their research. Because fundraising isn't only effective, valuable and worthwhile; it's also the biggest buzz I have found."  
  • Graeme Dawson

    Volunteer Team Leader

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    Graeme Dawson

    Volunteer Team Leader

    Graeme Dawson is one of our wonderful Volunteer Team Leaders. Thank you Graeme for sharing your story with us. "I enjoy fundraising, and have over the years volunteered for a number of causes writing grant applications to trusts. But I was keen to also do something very practical and meet people face-to-face. I stumbled across the opportunity to volunteer with Prostate Cancer UK having seen an advert through our local Volunteer Centre to be a Volunteer Team Leader for collections at the York City football matches. Having been Team Leader at York City FC for two years now, I must say I have thoroughly enjoyed my time so far with the charity. It's a busy role to take on, but it's one that's brilliant fun, working with a keen team and encouraging everyone to engage with the fans as they make their way to the match. It's fantastic to see such support and interest from the fans. For a small club we raised great totals, and awareness too. And in a busy environment of people rushing for the match, it was moving to have conversations with the men stopping at our buckets and sharing with us their own prostate cancer stories. I even took my Dad along collecting, and that opened up important health conversations in our own family. It's important for men to get together to tackle men's health issues. Too often it's too easy to ignore pain or symptoms, and just discuss the match instead. I am proud to have played my small part in cracking prostate cancer."  
  • Chris Bergman

    Volunteer Team Leader

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    Chris Bergman

    Volunteer Team Leader

    After our Sledgehammer campaign, we all know the prostate is the size of a walnut. So Chris Bergman was surprised when he learned the prostate could grow to the size of an orange! He learned this a few years ago when he was diagnosed with an enlarged prostate. After a few biopsies, his treatment was successful and he is now doing well. It was after these biopsies that he developed an interest in all things prostate – this, combined with his passion for football, led him directly to Prostate Cancer UK. He didn’t miss a beat and very quickly joined Men United, and has been a loyal supporter ever since. When asked what team he supports, he said (quietly) "Blackburn Rovers", and is an active bucket shaker and Volunteer Team Leader at many Rovers games. It’s been a win-win for him. Well - not really, because they have yet to win a game he’s collected at, but he’s still collecting valuable funds for men affected by prostate cancer which we really appreciate. Not all teams can be on top performance but luckily for him, one of his teams, Men United, is doing very well.  With support from people like Chris, we are making huge strides towards helping men affected by prostate cancer enjoy a better quality of life. Chris also completed a speaker training course, which is second nature for him coming from a career in sales. It’s wonderful to hear he enjoys speaking to groups, and he has recently visited rotary and lions clubs to spread the message. Chris is not ready to give up on summer yet and after seeing our Man V BBQ campaign, he has big plans to dust off the tongs, fire up the grill and host a BBQ at his local golf club, which he couldn’t live closer to if he tried. Armed with his way with words, sausages and rogue golf balls to sell, it’s a recipe for success. We heard the day was a great success as he BBQ'd for 7.5 hours, raising over £200 for us. Thank you Chris! Chris said he’s pleased to be able to do his part raising money and awareness of this disease, meeting loads of great people along the way. You may have noted his photo, taken in the Granada studios during filming of Countdown which was hosted by none other than Jeff Stelling - also in our Hall of Fame. We couldn’t be more thrilled to have such a loyal supporter on board. If you’d like to join Chris, check out our volunteer opportunities here.
  • John Donaldson

    Volunteer Team Leader

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    John Donaldson

    Volunteer Team Leader

    John’s granddad, Alec McNair was the longest serving player for Celtic FC, now John could be the next longest serving player for Prostate Cancer UK. It all started in December 2010 when he noticed he had some problems with his waterworks but thinking it was nothing, chose to ignore it. Eventually, when it didn’t go away, he went to his GP. At the age of 66, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer. It was small, not aggressive, he had a PSA of 7. He was lucky.  He was sent home with a Prostate Cancer UK toolkit, which detailed the different treatment options available to him. He placed it carefully on his kitchen table where it sat for weeks. His wife read it. His son read it. But John didn’t read it. He couldn’t bring himself to read it, knowing that once he did, it would really hit home. Eventually he did and he decided on keyhole surgery. After being in hospital for two and a half days, he took a year to recover, having to live with fatigue and leakage problems. It was this lonely journey that connected him to Prostate Cancer UK. During his treatment, he wished he had someone to talk to who had been in a similar situation. In June 2011 when there was a call out for volunteers, he jumped at the chance to get involved with our one to one support service and loved every minute of it. At the beginning, his service was in high demand and he was receiving 2-3 calls every day. He’s also done awareness talks and helped with our campaign days. He enjoys collecting at football matches and at the Doncaster races, especially at games where he can see Sheffield Wednesday play, having been a loyal supporter since 1961. We can all learn a lot from John who decided not to let prostate cancer change his outlook on life. We are incredibly grateful to John for his support and the difference he makes in other men’s lives.
Greatest captain
  • Accrington Stanley

    Andy Procter (2002-12)

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    Accrington Stanley

    Andy Procter (2002-12)

    What made your captain so great? Loyalty is hard to find in modern football, and that's the attribute that gives Andy Procter the title as Accrington Stanley's best ever captain. The midfielder spent 10 years at Stanley and saw them earn promotion to the Conference, and then on to League Two. With more than 300 appearances for Stanley, he can't be accused of being a mercenary. What was his defining moment as skipper? Fans can't forget 2007, when Procter scored two priceless goals in Stanley's relegation six-pointer against Macclesfield, which they won 3-2 to seal their League Two status for another year. But his most defining moment as captain was in 2011 when he captained Stanley to fifth place in League Two, their highest ever position, and earned them a place in the play-offs. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? As one of the most determined football players you will ever see, Procter strikes you as someone who will do whatever it takes to reach his desired goal. With that, he would be Bryan Mills in Taken. Not because he's violent, but because of his sheer determination and dedication to the task at hand. By Jessica Farry - Accrington Stanley fan and sports columnist for Sligo Champion (Twitter: @JessicaFarry) Image courtesy of Action Images
  • AFC Wimbledon

    Dave Beasant (1979-88)

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    AFC Wimbledon

    Dave Beasant (1979-88)

    What made your captain so great? Dave Beasant may not be the most obvious choice for the best ever Wimbledon captain, but he was the glue of respectability in the Crazy Gang's finest hour. If there is a notion goalies don't make good skippers, Beasant flew in the face of it by shouting the loudest and showing other stoppers that leaving your area isn't always a bad thing. What was his most defining moment as skipper? His defining moment doubles up as one of the most iconic FA Cup final memories. His dive to thwart John Aldridge's penalty in 1988 still makes its way onto TV montages. He'd reserved his best save for his final appearance in a Dons shirt and the image of his outstretched frame denying Liverpool their League and Cup double will forever be etched in the memory of those watching. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? A reliable senior detective in a 1970s TV series (and a film!), who never took the lead role but was a side-kick with a presence. I give you Detective Sergeant George Carter in The Sweeney (except our version was much taller than Dennis Waterman). By SW19's Army Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Barnsley

    Neil Redfearn (1991-98)

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    Barnsley

    Neil Redfearn (1991-98)

    What made your captain so great? When looking back through Barnsley captains of yesteryear, it's impossible to ignore Neil Redfearn. Addressed by his team-mates as "Mr Barnsley", the goal-grabbing midfielder led the team to their only season in the English top flight, finishing that term as the Premiership's top-scoring midfielder. What was his defining moment as skipper? Barnsley kicked off their first game in the top flight on Saturday 9 August 1997, on a glorious Yorkshire afternoon in front of a packed Oakwell. After an incredible promotion campaign, it was only fitting that Neil 'Redders' Redfearn was the man to open the scoring that afternoon, briefly sending the Tykes to the top of the Premiership. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? In my eyes, Redfearn in a film would always be the Tyler Durden-type, arguably the coolest man ever. In reality, he is more like Andy Dufresne from The Shawshank Redemption. He was willing, determined, and although not fashionable or flashy, made sure he got the job done. By Dan Williams - writer and Barnsley fan Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Birmingham City

    Stephen Carr (2009-13)

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    Birmingham City

    Stephen Carr (2009-13)

    What made your captain so great? It takes a special captain to inspire his team to victory with the odds stacked against them. To do that in a League Cup final, having bounced back from retirement and injury, is something else. When Stephen Carr came to Birmingham he was out of shape and out of practice, but determination helped him go from triallist to conquering club skipper. What was his defining moment as skipper? My favourite image is Carr roaring at the crowd to, 'Come on!' after the final whistle of the 2011 Carling Cup final victory over Arsenal. He'd earlier etched his name into City folklore by taunting a whole stand of Aston Villa fans with a choice hand gesture - even if it did cost him a one-match ban. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? If football was Hollywood then Carr would be Rocky Balboa in Rocky IV - a former hero climbing back into the ring one more time. Stephen Carr might not have ended the Cold War as Rocky apparently did, but he ended the long wait for a trophy for Birmingham City. By Daniel Ivery -  Often Partisan Twitter: @often_partisan Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Blackburn Rovers

    Tim Sherwood (1992-99)

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    Blackburn Rovers

    Tim Sherwood (1992-99)

    What made your captain so great? With a never-ending desire to work, Tim Sherwood earned his nickname 'The Grafter' in the Blackburn midfield. With a Premier League title-hunting squad assembled expensively around him, Sherwood took on the role of leader. The likes of Alan Shearer, Chris Sutton and Stuart Ripley may have grabbed the headlines, but fan-favourite Sherwood was the goods in the back. What was his defining moment as skipper? Besides lifting the Premier League trophy on 14 May 1995, a soundbite from the club's former owner Jack Walker springs to mind. When quizzed about lining up a bid for Zinedine Zidane back in the mid 90s, Walker retorted to then manager Kenny Dalglish: "Why do you want to sign Zidane when we have Tim Sherwood?" If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? John Connor in Terminator 2: Judgment Day. Perhaps not the most obvious hero, but when the pressure was on, Sherwood delivered by fighting for the cause. And like John, he did it all with those lovely old-school hair curtains. By Mikey Delap - The Wild Blackburn Rover (Twitter: @MikeyDelap) Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Blackpool

    Jimmy Armfield (1954-71)

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    Blackpool

    Jimmy Armfield (1954-71)

    What made your captain so great? Jimmy Armfield is a true gentleman and legend. A one-club man who captained the side for 10 years and made 569 appearances, he set a great example to everyone at the club and continues to do so as our vice president. Our south stand is named in his honour, with a statue of him standing outside. What was his defining moment as skipper? Jimmy didn't lift any major trophies, but he was in the side that finished second in the top flight in 1955-56. Later on, he captained the side to promotion from the second division in 1969-70. His most memorable moments are those times he wore the England armband - the only Blackpool player to do so - on 15 occasions. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Jimmy's a good guy and a straight-talking northerner, which limits the list of characters he could be. In the past he was a straight cut and clean-shaven, so Captain James T Kirk in Star Trek. By John Campbell - Blackpool FC Blog (Twitter: @blackpoolfcblog) Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Bolton Wanderers

    Nat Lofthouse (1946-60)

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    Bolton Wanderers

    Nat Lofthouse (1946-60)

    What made your captain so great? Nat Lofthouse was talented, gritty, determined and successful. He is undeniably an all-time great, scoring 30 goals in 33 games for England and 285 in 503 for Bolton - the only club he ever played for. He was the embodiment of everything English football has always been about. What was his defining moment as skipper? Bolton last won a trophy in 1958, beating Man Utd in the FA Cup final. Not only did Nat lead us out that day, he also scored both goals in a 2-0 win. The second was controversial as he shoulder-charged both ball and keeper over the line. It was a legitimate tactic at the time, and it summed up the passion and commitment you'd want from your target man. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? After his shoulder-charging exploits you might expect us to go for Dirty Harry. However he wasn't dirty - just a good old-fashioned English footballer. In his words: "In my day, there were plenty of fellas who would kick your b****cks off. The difference was, at the end of the match they'd shake your hand and help you look for them." By Geoff Moss and Christopher Parr - The Men In White Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Bournemouth

    Mark Newson (1985-89)

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    Bournemouth

    Mark Newson (1985-89)

    What made your captain so great? I have to go with Mark Newson as AFC Bournemouth's greatest captain. He was always a player that others looked towards for inspiration when the team needed a lift and he lead by example on the pitch. What was his defining moment as skipper? Mark led the team to the second division for the very first time in the 1986-87 season. This is the club's greatest achievement and has only recently been equalled by the 2012-13 team, which was built with far more investment. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Mark Newson had the debonair looks and the suave playing ability of Dirty Dancing's Patrick Swayze. He was a cool and accomplished full-back with a bit of a swagger. By Peter Bell - Cherry Chimes
  • Bradford City

    Stuart McCall (1982-88, 98-2002)

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    Bradford City

    Stuart McCall (1982-88, 98-2002)

    What made your captain so great? McCall inspired everyone he played alongside and visibly made them perform better. Taking McCall out of the side was like taking the team's heartbeat away. He'd never give up, covering every blade of grass as he chased every cause. He led by example and demanded his team-mates maintain the same high standards. What was his defining moment as skipper? In the 1980s McCall was hugely influential, with Bradford narrowly missing out on promotion to the top flight. He was sold to Everton in 1988 and later played for Rangers. Ten years later, he returned to Bradford and this time lead the club to promotion to the Premier League, declaring it "the best moment of my career". Memorably, he celebrated by drunkenly falling off a parked car. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? McCall's Scottish heritage enables us to invoke images of William Wallace in Braveheart. Like Wallace, McCall was the type of warrior you wanted on your side. His leadership got the best out of those around him and helped Bradford achieve some truly heroic victories. By Jason McKeown - The Width Of A Post Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Brentford

    Kevin O’Connor (1999-present)

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    Brentford

    Kevin O’Connor (1999-present)

    What made your captain so great? Kevin O'Connor, Super Kevin O'Connor or just simply King Kev is, beyond doubt, Brentford's greatest captain. Fast approaching 500 appearances for the Bees, Mr Brentford has always put the club before himself, meaning that he has played in virtually every position possible. Such loyalty is very rare nowadays. What was his defining moment as skipper? You can't define a single moment - his entire career has culminated in him being a living legend at the club. From when he first signed pro terms in 1999 to today, O'Connor has just gone about creating more and more magical moments. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Maximus Decimus Meridius from Gladiator. A well-loved general, adored by those he leads and respected by higher authority, King Kev is most definitely Brentford's very own legendary centurion, gladiator and captain. By Ryan O'Donovan - Life On The Bee Roads Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Brighton

    Brian ‘Nobby’ Horton (1976-81)

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    Brighton

    Brian ‘Nobby’ Horton (1976-81)

    What made your captain so great? Brian Horton is one of the most popular players, let alone captains, in Albion's history. Nobby led an attractive midfield that, between his arrival in February 1976 and May 1979, saw Albion go from Third Division stalwarts to First Division regulars. He was loved as an attacking, goal-scoring midfielder and respected as a hard-as-nails leader. A real Goldstone legend. What was his defining moment as skipper? Horton was at the centre of two important events in Albion's history. He led the team on one of our greatest days, a 3-1 win at Newcastle United in 1979 that secured promotion to the top flight for the first time. Less gloriously, Horton was ordered to re-take a successful penalty in an FA Cup replay against Crystal Palace in the winter of 1976. He missed it, a riot ensued, and a famous and bitter rivalry with the Eagles was born. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Nobby was scruffy and skinny, but had a killer sense of humour and was always smiling on the pitch, winding up the opposition. We're drawn towards Jack Nicholson's famous Randle McMurphy in One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest. The Goldstone crowd would certainly consider the ground a sort of asylum, and in the end we sold Nobby to Luton Town. We'll leave it to you to decide if that's better or worse than electroshock therapy. By The Seagull Love Review Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Bristol City

    Rob Newman (1981-91)

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    Bristol City

    Rob Newman (1981-91)

    What made your captain so great? In 1982, Bristol City had been torn apart by debt, and eight first-teamers tearing up their contracts thrust the youth team into the starting line-up. An 18-year-old debutant, Rob 'Biff' Newman immediately became their leader. Over the next decade the Bristol Babe would play in just about every outfield position, dragging the team back up the league with a mixture of determination and ability. Adored on the terraces, he was the perfect totem for the club's return from (very nearly) extinction. What was his defining moment as skipper? You can't pick one - Biff didn't do moments, he did consistency. Two promotions, a League Cup semi-final, 54 goals in 394 games - he did the hard work well, did Biff. But if you want an absolute belter, run a YouTube search for Bristol City 4 Newport County 0, 1987 and marvel at Newman's 40-yard stunner. Boom. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Hellboy. Because both appear to be hewn from granite, yet you can't help but love them. By Will Jones - To The Left Of Ross Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Bristol Rovers

    Stuart Campbell (2004-11)

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    Bristol Rovers

    Stuart Campbell (2004-11)

    What made your captain so great? Stuart Campbell was a humble man, leading by example both on and off the pitch. He captained the team in the 2006-2007 season when we won promotion at Wembley and finished as runners-up in the Johnstone's Paint Trophy, beating Bristol City in the area final. For that he will always be remembered fondly. What was his defining moment as skipper? Scoring a 30-yard pearler against Lincoln City in the second leg of the 2006-07 play-off semi-final. He played the Claude Makelele role in midfield and hadn't ventured far enough up the pitch all season to even think about scoring a goal. Those who witnessed such a beautifully struck shot were party to a genuine 'I was there' moment. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Campbell was the sheriff who kept everybody in check and ensured the ugly side of the game was dealt with effectively, so our Rickie Lambert-spearheaded attack could focus on scoring goals. He played a massive part in everything we did. Essentially, he was our very own Woody from Toy Story. By Nathan Bees - Life's A Gas Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Burnley

    Steven Caldwell (2007-10)

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    Burnley

    Steven Caldwell (2007-10)

    What made your captain so great? Steven Caldwell was an organiser, keeping the back four in check. He was never quick but read the game well, and was always in the right place at the right time. And he was the skipper for our greatest modern achievement - promotion to the Premier League. What was his defining moment as skipper? Lifting the play-off trophy at Wembley in 2009. Such an unbelievable achievement for a club like ours to get to the Premier League and we wouldn't have been able to do it without him. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Indiana Jones. He's a bit older than your usual hero and a bit more gnarled, but he gets the job done. I imagine he'd look pretty ace in a hat as well. I don't know why. By Jamie Smith - No Nay Never Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Burton Albion

    Darren Stride (1993-2010)

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    Burton Albion

    Darren Stride (1993-2010)

    What made your captain so great? Burton born and bred, 'Stridey' progressed through the Brewers' ranks and went on to make nearly 700 appearances for the club (a club record) over a glittering 17-year career. The inspirational skipper is even Albion's third all-time leading scorer. A courageous man, born leader and role model who demonstrated an undying loyalty scarcely seen in the modern game. What was his defining moment as skipper? While closely pushed by his helping to hold Manchester United to a draw in the FA Cup back in 2006, it has to be his captaining of Albion as they won promotion to the Football League for the first time in their history in 2009. With it, he fulfilled his dreams to elevate Albion from the non-league doldrums. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? John McClane in Die Hard - focused, battling, gritty, tenacious, determined and inevitably covered in sweat as he stretches every sinew, takes risks and throws his body on the line. By Burton fan Luca Gallone Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Bury

    Chris Lucketti (1993-99)

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    Bury

    Chris Lucketti (1993-99)

    What made your captain so great? Chris Lucketti was Bury captain during the Shakers' most successful period in recent history. Signed from non-league in 1993, he went on to make over 250 appearances for the club and led them to back-to-back promotions in 1996 and 1997. He was an inspirational leader and remains a club legend. What was his defining moment as skipper? Lucketti was part of the first Bury side to play at Wembley and led the club to famous Division One victories over both Manchester City and Nottingham Forest. However, his crowning glory came at Gigg Lane in May 1997 when Bury were crowned Division Two champions and he lifted the trophy. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Wolverine! He might not necessarily have been the prettiest footballer, but Lucketti never shirked the responsibility that came with the armband. Like Wolverine, he also had incredible powers of recovery. He was NEVER injured and clocked up an impressive 235 league appearances in less than six years for the Shakers. By Mark Crossley - We Are Going Up podcast Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Carlisle Utd

    Kevin Gray (2003-07)

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    Carlisle Utd

    Kevin Gray (2003-07)

    What made your captain so great? After relegation to the Conference in 2004, Carlisle's subsequent surge up the divisions was in no small part down to this man. His authoritative approach and desire to succeed made him an instant hit and his formidable partnership with Danny Livesey at centre-back was the lynchpin of a thriving side during some of the club's golden days. What was his defining moment as skipper? Gray guided Carlisle to the top half of League One via the Conference and League Two before leaving the club in 2007. Picking one defining moment is tough, but leading his troops out to war at the Millennium Stadium against Swansea in the Football League Trophy final symbolised the dramatic strides Carlisle had made under his guidance. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? He'd have to be John Rambo: a stoic combatant with a never-say-die attitude, who demonstrated heroism in the face of adversity. Former team-mates have since talked about "veins popping out of his neck" in the moments leading up to a game. His leadership under the mantra of winning by any means necessary won him as many friends as it did enemies. By Jake Phillips - Bring Me The Head Of Keith Mincher Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Charlton Athletic

    Mark Kinsella (1996-2002)

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    Charlton Athletic

    Mark Kinsella (1996-2002)

    What made your captain so great? Signed by Alan Curbishley in 1996 for £150,000 from Colchester, Mark Kinsella quickly became an integral part of a Charlton team that reached the Premier League in 1998, before leading them back to the top flight as Championship winners two years later. A two-time player of the year, Kinsella led by example, never shirking a challenge. He covered mile after mile and his vocal encouragement for team-mates was obvious. What was his defining moment as skipper? Lifting the Championship play-off trophy at Wembley in May 1998, after Charlton beat Sunderland following an epic 4-4 draw that saw the Addicks win 7-6 on penalties. It has been called the greatest game ever seen at the old stadium. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Andy Dufresne from The Shawshank Redemption. Always calm under pressure, Kinsella thought first, acted second, and had a long-term plan for success. By Peter Finch - Charlton Live! Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Cheltenham Town

    Chris Banks (1994-2004)

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    Cheltenham Town

    Chris Banks (1994-2004)

    What made your captain so great? Once described by a national broadsheet as being "swept with time for elegance", Chris Banks was at the centre of Cheltenham Town's rise from obscurity, enjoying unprecedented success as club captain. The defensive stalwart steered the Robins from the Southern League to League One, leading by example both on and off the pitch throughout his 10-year spell at Whaddon Road. What was his defining moment as skipper? Lifting the FA Trophy at Wembley in May 1998 was a moment for Banks to savour, but on 22 April 1999, he would further etch his name into the club's history. After making 45 starts in the 1998-99 season, the fans' favourite guided the Robins to the Conference title, playing the game of his life against Yeovil Town to send the Robins soaring into the Football League. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Domineering on the ball and confident in style, one might compare Banks to the people's hero, Colonel John 'Hannibal' Smith. Like the A-Team leader, Banks, a soldier of fortune, led his crack defensive unit with panache and military precision. Achieving unrivalled success at Whaddon Road, he loved it when a plan came together. By Peter Fielding - Peter Fielding's Blog Special thanks to Jon Palmer from the Gloucestershire Echo.  Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Chesterfield

    John ‘Dan’ Archer (1969-72)

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    Chesterfield

    John ‘Dan’ Archer (1969-72)

    What made your captain so great? Dan wasn't by any stretch of the imagination Chesterfield's best ever player. He was a tough and uncompromising but creative midfielder. He was known to like a drink and a pie, and some of his gaseous outputs were legendary - indeed manager Jimmy McGuigan once threatened to throw him off the coach and leave him in a lay-by if he 'did that again'. What was his defining moment as skipper? With sleeves rolled up and fists clenched, Dan brought out the best in the team, leading the Spireites to the Division Four title in his debut season, a first promotion in 34 years. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Very much Sean Connery's Jim Malone in The Untouchables, a hard-playing team man who knows winning is the only result of note. By Phil Tooley - Sky Is Blue Clouds Are White... Image courtesy of cfchistory.com
  • Colchester Utd

    Tony English (1984-96)

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    Colchester Utd

    Tony English (1984-96)

    What made your captain so great? The always-consistent Tony English made more than 500 appearances for the club between 1984 and 1996, and played just about anywhere on the field - even in goal. Nominally a defender, he scored 50 goals, including a hat-trick. Approachable, he was a leader of men who quietly got on with the job in hand. What was his defining moment as a skipper? After dropping out of the Football League in 1990, English remained with United during the two seasons of non-league football. He captained the club to the non-league double in 1992 and back to the Football League, and was one of the inaugural inductees into the club's Hall of Fame. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Batman's butler Alfred would be the perfect character for Tony English. Reliable, trusting, intelligent and resourceful, with tactical knowledge to boot, he allowed the more skilful players to take the glory - but his efforts were crucial to the overall success of the club at that time. By Graeson Laitt - Colchester United Statistic Websites Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Coventry City

    Brian Kilcline (1984-91)

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    Coventry City

    Brian Kilcline (1984-91)

    What made your captain so great? He may not have been the greatest player we ever had, but Brian Kilcline was iconic. He was rugged, dominant and represented the determination that Coventry City has needed over the years. Kilcline led the team away from obligatory survival fights and mediocrity, and on one special occasion, became the symbol of our greatest ever achievement. What was his defining moment as skipper? Not only was it his most defining moment, it was the most important moment in the Sky Blues' history. Etched in the mind of every City fan, regardless of age, is 1987. As commander of that FA Cup final team, Kilcline will forever be remembered as the man who walked up those Wembley steps and lifted the club's first, and only, major trophy. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? 'Killer' may evoke ideas of much angrier characters, but there's no hiding the distinct look of Professor Dumbledore about him nowadays. Considering the club's current plight, it makes his achievement as captain look all the more magical. By Neil Allison - Sky Blues Blog Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Crawley Town

    Pablo Mills (2010-12)

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    Crawley Town

    Pablo Mills (2010-12)

    What made your captain so great? Pablo Mills skippered Crawley Town in arguably the club's greatest ever campaign in 2010-11. His never-say-die attitude played a key part in a number of late victories during that season. Mills put his body on the line numerous times and also popped up with some important goals. What was his defining moment as skipper? Mills captained the side against Manchester United at Old Trafford in Crawley's 1-0 FA Cup defeat in 2011. The former Rotherham United defender picked up the man of the match award against his boyhood team after keeping the lively Javier Hernandez and Wayne Rooney in check throughout. Not a bad place to have his defining moment! If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Mills would be Indiana Jones. Calm when under pressure, but not afraid to get stuck in when the going gets tough, he also likes to crack the whip if team-mates aren't pulling their weight! By Warren Lucy - The Goalmouth Scramble Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Crewe Alexandra

    Geoff Thomas (1984-87, 2001-02)

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    Crewe Alexandra

    Geoff Thomas (1984-87, 2001-02)

    What made your captain so great? 'Mr Versatility' was a tenacious central midfielder who enjoyed a two-and-a-half year stint in the mid 80s before returning for a single season in 2001. He would carry his often beleaguered side at times and he had all the necessary traits of a truly exceptional captain: hunger, leadership and passion. That he went on to represent his country says it all. What was his defining moment as skipper? His main defining moment as captain came not for Crewe but for Crystal Palace as he led the team out at Wembley for the 1990 FA Cup final. However, that wouldn't have happened without Thomas being the lynchpin of a side moulded by the great Dario Gradi. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would it be? Slightly clichéd, but Rocky springs to mind. Thomas has always been a grafter and a fighter, and he continues to prove that every day with his charity work after he beat leukaemia, despite being given only a 30 per cent chance of living beyond the age of 41. He has even cycled the Tour de France course to raise money for the Geoff Thomas foundation. Liam Morgan - Crewe fan and writer for laliganews.tv Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Dag & Red

    Anwar Uddin (2004-10)

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    Dag & Red

    Anwar Uddin (2004-10)

    What made your captain so great? Anwar commanded respect just by his very presence. He was a strong, brave defender who led by example and was always encouraging his team-mates. He embraced his status as one of very few British Asians in professional football, speaking eloquently in the media on matters of race and working with Show Racism the Red Card. A real leader on and off the pitch. What was his defining moment as skipper? Leading us to the Conference title in 2006-07. After a couple of years of mid-table mediocrity, everything fell into place as we stormed to promotion by a 14-point margin. In the process, Anwar became the first Asian captain of a Football League club. If he were a character in a movie, who would he be and why? Atticus Finch in To Kill A Mockingbird. He conducted himself with a quiet dignity while showing courage and bravery. Led by example and paved the way for others to follow. Also looks particularly dapper in a waistcoat! By We Only Need 9 Men Twitter: @9men Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Derby County

    Roy McFarland (1967-81, 1983-84)

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    Derby County

    Roy McFarland (1967-81, 1983-84)

    What made your captain so great? Signed as a teenager by Brian Clough in 1967, Roy McFarland went on to lead the Rams side that rose spectacularly from Second Division mediocrity to become champions of England. Learning from the legendary Dave Mackay on the pitch, McFarland developed into a dominant, ball-playing England centre-half and one of Derby's all-time greats. What was his defining moment as skipper? McFarland took over from Mackay as captain in 1971 and led the Rams to the title the same season. Derby had to win their penultimate home game against Huddersfield to keep their title aspirations alive and McFarland, head still bandaged from an injury sustained two weeks before, settled the home faithful's nerves by heading in the first goal. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Because of the magnetic personality and incredible talent of the greatest manager of the era, Brian Clough, McFarland has himself been portrayed in a major movie - The Damned United. Not that he liked the film - McFarland has said that Michael Sheen's performance as Clough is its only redeeming feature. By Ollie Wright - Derby County Blog Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Doncaster Rovers

    Barry Miller (2000-03)

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    Doncaster Rovers

    Barry Miller (2000-03)

    What made your captain so great? As Doncaster get set for another season in the second tier it can be easy to forget our five year sojourn in the Conference, but in those dark depths shone bright lights, such as Barry Miller. Calm, controlled, measured: he was a central defender of real quality who looked a class apart on the field and yet remained greatly approachable to supporters. His immovable presence at the back saw him earn the nickname 'Covered in Monkeys', a nod to the similarities between him and the Rock of Gibraltar. What was his defining moment as skipper? We waited ages for Barry's first goal, and when it finally came, away at Northwich, he celebrated in emphatic style... by punching Jimmy Quinn, the particularly whingey Victoria player-manager, square in the jaw two minutes later. Truly a man of the people. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? As Barry now works for the church, how about any character played by Brittni Ruiz? Both she and Barry were acclaimed for delivering highly pornographic performances in their chosen career fields, before ultimately finding God. By Glen Wilson - Popular Stand Twitter: @vivarovers  
  • Exeter City

    Shaun Taylor (1986-91)

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    Exeter City

    Shaun Taylor (1986-91)

    What made your captain so great? You always expect your captain to give 100 per cent - Shaun Taylor gave this and more. A free transfer from local non-league side Bideford, the centre-back's unwavering commitment and excellent leadership skills made for a superb captain and he remains a fan favourite at St James Park to this day. What was his defining moment as skipper? Not many former City skippers can say they led the Grecians to a promotion; Taylor is one of the few who can. He captained Terry Cooper's legendary side, featuring the likes of Darren Rowbotham, Steve Neville and Brian McDermott, to the Fourth Division (now League Two) title in 1990 - the Grecians' only major trophy to date. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? On the field Taylor could be compared to the great John Wayne, in that, at 6ft 1in, he was a rather 'leggy' footballer who had a no-nonsense playing style. He was tough - and you knew he was tough! By Ollie Heptinstall - It's Only A Game Twitter: @OliHepy Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Fleetwood Town

    Steve McNulty (2009-13)

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    Fleetwood Town

    Steve McNulty (2009-13)

    What made your captain so great? Before 2009, supporting Fleetwood Town wasn't a glorious pursuit - unless you were old enough to remember a trio of Lancashire Combination Cup wins in the 1930s. But two promotions in three seasons from 2009-10 took the Cod Army from Conference North to the Football League. Town's skipper, Steve McNulty - a Cod Army legend. He looked a bit bulky, but you'd underestimate the centre-half at your peril. An excellent reader of the game and a great positional player who was rarely caught out for pace. What was his defining moment as skipper? Lifting the Conference trophy in front of the home crowd at Highbury in April 2012. McNulty led the club on a 29-game unbeaten run to guide the Cod Army to the promised land of the Football League. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Because of his sheer size and ape-like superhuman physical strength, he was often dubbed 'Beast', the comic book character made famous in the X-Men films. Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Gillingham

    Andy Hessenthaler (1996-2006)

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    Gillingham

    Andy Hessenthaler (1996-2006)

    What made your captain so great? There can be few who have played a more pivotal role at their club, by galvanising both the team and the fans, than Andy Hessenthaler. Leading the team for a short spell quickly led him into a player-manager role that culminated in him securing the Gills' highest ever finish in the Championship. What was his defining moment as skipper? Brought in by Tony Pulis, he captained the side in our first ever Wembley appearance, against Manchester City. Although the Gills lost on penalties, it began a run that would see the club enjoy the greatest spell in its history just a few years after almost folding during its period of obscurity in the bottom tier. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? John McClane (Die Hard). Often found with a solemn expression, his tenacity and never-say-die attitude made him a firm favourite at Watford and the Gills (not to mention some opposition clubs too). He was a constant thorn in the opposition's side, always thwarting their efforts, and was sometimes spotted in a vest during the warm-up. By Gary Wade - Gillingham FC commentator Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Hartlepool Utd

    Ritchie Humphreys (2001-13)

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    Hartlepool Utd

    Ritchie Humphreys (2001-13)

    What made him so great? In 12 seasons with Hartlepool Ritchie Humphreys made a club record of 544 appearances. He achieved promotion with the club from Division Two in 2002-03 and again in 2006-07. Humphreys was later voted player of the 2000s. Loyal, fair and determined, he always gave 100 per cent for the shirt and the fans. Pools fans will never forget him. What was his defining moment as skipper? Humphreys' defining moment was scoring a penalty in sudden death against Tranmere Rovers in the 2004-05 Division Two play-off semi-finals. The goal took Hartlepool to Wembley to face his former club Sheffield Wednesday. A born leader, Ritchie was always vocal on the pitch and had the respect of his team-mates. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? If Ritchie were a character in a famous movie, he would be Rocky Balboa because of his perseverance. He strived to win but was always gracious in defeat. Having recently coached the side he is a future Hartlepool manager in waiting. By John Mason - We Are Going Up Hartlepool United blogger Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Huddersfield Town

    Clem Stephenson (1920-29)

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    Huddersfield Town

    Clem Stephenson (1920-29)

    What made your captain so great? It is easy to forget that Huddersfield Town won the league title three times in a row in the 1920s, led by their greatest ever captain, Clem Stephenson. The inside-forward was legendary manager Herbert Chapman's voice on the field, and a noted passer, a regular goal scorer and a tireless worker. What was his defining moment as skipper? At the awarding of a penalty during Huddersfield's FA Cup final against Preston in 1922, Stephenson advised penalty taker Billy Smith (who was being hectored by the theatrics of the Preston goalkeeper) - to "ne'er mind the devil dances, just shove it in the net". This summed up Stephenson, who was no-nonsense in his approach and trusted by his team-mates. Smith duly scored and Town won 1-0. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? The Sundance Kid. If Herbert Chapman was the scheming and intelligent Butch Cassidy, then Stephenson would've been his deadly, gun-slinging sidekick. I don't think they ever went to Bolivia together, but they were unquestionably a great duo. By Charlie Johnson - The 90 Second Football Blog Twitter: @FootballCharlie Image courtesy of Getty Images
  • Ipswich Town

    Mick Mills (1966-82)

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    Ipswich Town

    Mick Mills (1966-82)

    What made your captain so great? Mick Mills was manager Bobby Robson's right-hand man on the pitch for most of the legendary boss's time in charge. Not a blood and thunder sort of figure like Terry Butcher, but a quieter yet equally effective leader who went about the job in such a manner that it was difficult to imagine anyone else captaining the Blues in the 1970s. What was his defining moment as skipper? For Town, either lifting the FA Cup in 1978, or the Uefa Cup - no mean feat lifting that one - in 1981. For England, it was leading Ron Greenwood's men at the World Cup in 1982. Aside from winning the thing, it doesn't get much better than skippering your country at a World Cup, does it? If he was a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? While Butcher might be compared to stars of various slasher movies or most of the cast of Reservoir Dogs, it's the measured approach to life of Le Carré's George Smiley that is perhaps more reminiscent of Mills' captaincy. Somewhat appropriately, there's even a Town game from the Mills era on in the background during a scene in the TV version of Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. By Phil Ham from the independent Ipswich Town website TWTD.co.uk Twitter: @twtduk Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Leeds Utd

    Billy Bremner (1959-76)

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    Leeds Utd

    Billy Bremner (1959-76)

    What made your captain so great? Bremner helped put Leeds United on the map. He led the Whites to our most successful era - collecting an impressive haul of silverware - and is now immortalised in song, film and statue. Greatness can only be measured in success, and at Elland Road, no one achieved more wearing the captain's armband than Billy Bremner. What was his defining moment as skipper? Bremner became captain in 1966, leading Leeds to success in the League Cup and Fairs Cup in 1968, but the following season was his defining moment. In 1969 Bremner led Leeds United to our first ever league title, losing just two of our 42 league games in the process. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Nicky Santoro from Casino. Bremner was usually the smallest player on the pitch but feared no one. In an era where combative football was the norm, Bremner's diminutive size never stood in his way. Dubbed "10st of barbed wire" by the Sunday Times, Bremner is remembered as much for his take no prisoners approach as for his footballing greatness. By David Wilkinson - The Scratching Shed Twitter: @TSSLUFC Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Leicester City

    Steve Walsh (1986-2000)

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    Leicester City

    Steve Walsh (1986-2000)

    What made your captain so great? Steve Walsh was a captain who led by example, demanding of his team-mates the same grit and determination that were the hallmarks of his own performances. He had the charisma to get it from the fans as well. A clenched fist towards the Kop was enough to inspire a roar from thousands in response. What was his defining moment as skipper? His greatest moment came in 1994. Walsh returned from what looked like a season-ending injury to fire two goals past Derby in the Division One play-off final. The photo of Walsh celebrating his winner five minutes from time to put Leicester in the Premier League remains one of the club's most iconic images. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? His dependability, ability to inspire his team and the devotion of his fans (not to mention being there to save the day all too often) fit nicely with Woody from Toy Story. Sure, we all grow older and new toys come along, but any fan who had the pleasure of watching him play will never forget Steve Walsh. By Mike McCarthy - Foxblogger Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Leyton Orient

    Steve Castle (1984-92, 2000-01)

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    Leyton Orient

    Steve Castle (1984-92, 2000-01)

    What made your captain so great? The 1980s: bad music, bad fashion, bad food and - if you were an Orient fan - football so bad you wanted to weep. Thank heaven, then, for Steve Castle - Castle by name, towering midfield fortress by nature - who lit up those dark days of Division Four and ultimately dragged the club by the scruff of its neck to play-off glory in the final year of that godforsaken decade. What was his defining moment as skipper? That 1989 promotion aside, there was the small matter of Castle's 19 goals from midfield in the 1990-91 season. Unfortunately, his defining moment was his last as captain: he was arrested for doing a runner from the Leicester Square Pizza Hut and had the armband taken from him in punishment. "Where's your pizza gone?" sang witty Southend fans at the next home game, to which Castle responded with two goals in a 3-2 Orient victory. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Steve McQueen in The Great Escape. He had the guile, the courage and the speed, yet - like McQueen's character, Virgil Hilts - couldn't quite outrun the authorities when it actually mattered. By Matt Simpson - View From The West Stand Twitter: West_Stand_O Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Mansfield Town

    Adam Murray (2002, 2004-05, 2010-)

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    Mansfield Town

    Adam Murray (2002, 2004-05, 2010-)

    What made your captain so great? Adam Murray had a troubled start to his career, battling with a drinking problem during his time at Derby. He's shown bravery to fight off demons, critics and injury to progress into a strong-willed character who wears his Stags heart on his sleeve. What was his defining moment as skipper? At the end of the 2011-12 season, we'd just lost to York in the play-offs and he broke down in tears on the pitch. You could tell that winning with Stags meant so much. So to get up and lead us to the title a year later totally defined his character. If he was a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Probably a successful Mike Bassett! Murray's so passionate about MTFC he'd do literally anything to deliver success. His whole career has been a battle and even through the darkest of times he's prevailed - he won't shy away from his critics and he faces every task with a desire to succeed. By Craig Priest - Mansfield Matters Twitter: @mtfcmatters Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Middlesbrough

    Gareth Southgate (2001-06)

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    Middlesbrough

    Gareth Southgate (2001-06)

    What made your captain so great? Having signed for Middlesbrough for £6m in 2001, Southgate won club Player of the Year award in his first season and was handed the captain's armband for the start of the 2002-03 campaign. He led the club to its first - and only - major trophy and European final. What was his defining moment as skipper? In 2003-04, Boro beat Spurs and Arsenal en route to the League Cup final in Cardiff, where Gareth became the first captain to lift a major trophy in the club's 128-year history, beating Bolton 2-1. In his last game as a Boro player, Southgate led out the team in Eindhoven for the 2006 Uefa Cup final. Southgate was the first player to skipper Boro in European competitions and will remain a hero to many fans (despite his shaky foray into management). If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Southgate's likeness to Gérard Depardieu's Cyrano de Bergerac goes beyond his proboscis. He was eloquent, yet could look after himself in a scrap and was loyal to the end. By Rob P at the One Boro Forum Twitter: @oneboro Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Millwall

    Paul Robinson (2001-present)

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    Millwall

    Paul Robinson (2001-present)

    What makes your captain so great? In my lifetime it has to be Paul Robinson. Robbo, as he is known by Millwall fans, has recently clocked up 15 years at the Den - an unheard of length of service in modern football. Having made 334 appearances for Millwall since his debut against Preston in 2002, Robbo is a true legend at The Den. What was his defining moment as skipper? The defining moment of Robinson's career has to be the 2009-10 season. He scored the second goal in our 2-0 win in the League One play-off semi-final second leg to take the club back to Wembley, 12 months on from a play-off final defeat to Scunthorpe. In the 39th minute of the 2010 League One final, the definitive moment for Robbo came. From three yards out, he tapped home the winning goal to seal promotion back to the Championship, where Millwall are about to start their fourth consecutive season. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Gerard Butler as King Leonidas in 300. They are both warriors, one on a battleground, the other on a football pitch. They are both no-nonsense and also share a love of destroying the enemy. By Jay Taylor - Lion Tayls Twitter: Jay_Taylor18 Image courtesy of Action Images
  • MK Dons

    Keith Andrews (2006-08)

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    MK Dons

    Keith Andrews (2006-08)

    What made your captain so great? Andrews was no Vinnie Jones, he was one of the new breed of captain who led his team through his own footballing performance. He provided calmness to a Dons midfield that was previously bypassed thanks to manager Martin Allen's traditional hoof-and-hope style of play. The Ireland international was a box-to-box midfielder who could prevent goals just as well as score them. What was his defining moment as skipper? Being front and centre for MK Dons winning their first ever piece of silverware, which came thanks to a victory in the Johnstone's Paint Trophy final over Grimsby Town. To be the first captain to lift a trophy for MK Dons in front of 33,000 travelling fans from Buckinghamshire was special. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Superman. Not only does Andrews look like the square-jawed superhero, on many occasions he has played like him too. Such as in the 74th minute against Stockport in the 2007-08 season, when his sweetly struck goal secured the 3-2 win that got Milton Keynes promoted to League One.  By Harry Wilmin - MK Dons Supporters Association  Twitter: @WilminMKD Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Morecambe

    Gary Dullaghan (1990-96)

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    Morecambe

    Gary Dullaghan (1990-96)

    What made your captain so great? While Conference play-off final-winning captain James Bentley has been a magnificent servant to Morecambe, he's pipped to the post by Gary Dullaghan. A proper centre-half, 'Dulla' was big, strong, loved a tackle and also had the best year-round tan I've ever seen. Such is the regard in which Gary, who tragically died of cancer in 2006, is held, that there is a saying at Morecambe that simply states: "We knew Gary Dullaghan." What was his defining moment as skipper? Gary's may not be a familiar name with Football League fans, or with some of the younger generation of Shrimps, but he captained Morecambe through their successful promotion campaign from the Northern Premier League into the then 'big time' of the Football Conference. What he and his team-mates achieved that season provided the platform for the club to be where it is now. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Smokey And The Bandit's Burt Reynolds. A true man's man, and also a perma-tanned silver fox. By Nik Marsdin - Naples Of The North Twitter: @NaplesOfLeNorth  
  • Newport County

    Keith Oakes (1978-84)

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    Newport County

    Keith Oakes (1978-84)

    What made your captain so great? He was captain during the most successful time in Newport County's history, leading the team to a promotion and Welsh Cup double in 1980 and the Cup Winners' Cup quarter-finals in 1981. Inspirational at the back, he was also the top-scoring defender in the Football League for three seasons. What was his defining moment as skipper? The peak of his career at Newport County was the agonising 3-2 aggregate defeat to Carl Zeiss Jena in the Cup Winners' Cup quarter-final in March 1981. But the defining moment has to be lifting the Welsh Cup in front of 5,000 County fans at Shrewsbury the year before. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Keith would be John Wayne's character Colonel Mike Kirby in Green Berets, leading his elite group of troops into battle, inspiring everyone with his true grit along the way. As well as fracturing his jaw twice he once played for half an hour with a broken arm - without noticing! By Andrew Penman - South Wales Argus Twitter: @AndrewPenman1 Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Northampton Town

    Ian Sampson (1994-2004)

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    Northampton Town

    Ian Sampson (1994-2004)

    What made your captain so great? 449 games for the club makes 'Sammo' a Cobblers legend by default, but he was so much more than that stat. Leading by example from the back, he seemed to get his head on everything, was always ready to put his body on the line and popped up with a few goals at the other end as well. Speaking of which… What was his defining moment as skipper? When I think of Ian Sampson, the first image to come to mind is of him side-footing the ball into local rivals Peterborough's net on 23 December 2000. With the game at London Road finely poised at 1-1, Sammo popped up out of nowhere to slot in the winner in the 83rd minute to send 3,500 travelling fans into raptures! If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Clint Eastwood springs to mind for some reason, and I guess Frank Horrigan from In The Line Of Fire would suit nicely… a man whose ability is called into question early on but who goes on to defend everything with his life. By Danny Brothers - A Load Of Cobblers Twitter: @dannybrothers
  • Nottingham Forest

    Stuart Pearce (1985-97)

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    Nottingham Forest

    Stuart Pearce (1985-97)

    What made your captain so great? Stuart Pearce epitomised Forest. He was Forest. He is Forest. His bulging thighs, ferocious tackles, surging runs down the wing, unstoppable free-kicks and general committed-to-the-cause demeanour made him a fans' favourite during 12 years in the Garibaldi. Hard but fair, and never dirty, even Roy Keane called him a "man amongst boys". What was his defining moment as skipper? I don't think there's a single England fan, let alone Forest fan, who didn't feel something inside - something primal, something ecstatically joyful - when Pearce scored that penalty in the shoot-out against Spain in Euro 96. Having regained his place in the side, putting the ghosts of 1990 to rest showed the character of the man. If he was a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? The obvious answer is Psycho. But that doesn't really do him justice - a creepy motel owner who dresses up as his dead mother? The other nickname he might have got in the 80s was Rambo, which is probably more appropriate: muscular, uncompromising, a moral high ground, smarter than the opposition and he (doesn't) kill wild boars with his bare hands. By Pat Riddell - Seat Pitch Twitter: @SeatPitch Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Notts County

    Phil Turner (1989-96)

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    Notts County

    Phil Turner (1989-96)

    What made your captain so great? Very few footballers have earned the right to play on the hallowed Wembley turf - yet Phil Turner captained our side on no less than four occasions under the twin towers, guiding Notts to victory in three of them. What was his defining moment as skipper? His first of those victories, a 2-0 play-off final victory over Tranmere Rovers, which came in the year in which he was voted the supporters' player of the season. It would be the first of two successive seasons that would end in victory at Wembley, culminating in the club earning promotion to the top-flight in 1991 for only the second time in its post-war history. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Turner was surrounded by younger, more marketable talent; so too was Obi-Wan Kenobi. Turner's wise head made him Notts' very own Jedi Knight. By Stuart Brothers - The Notts Blog Twitter: @blackwhitezine Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Oldham Athletic

    Lee Duxbury (1997-2003)

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    Oldham Athletic

    Lee Duxbury (1997-2003)

    What made your captain so great? Lee Duxbury was a leader in every sense of the word. He was a shining example to a team of mainly younger players. Tough in the tackle and willing to drive his charges forward - I dubbed him 'Mr Dependable' due to his uncanny knack of popping up with priceless goals. What was his defining moment as skipper? If ever a game summed Duxbury up, it was our last visit to Maine Road in March 1999. With the Latics already a goal up, Duxbury made a late run to steal in unmarked and send a diving header past a perplexed Nicky Weaver. Despite City pulling one back and throwing the kitchen sink at the Latics, Duxbury's goal was the winner. Legend status attained! If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? A man who excelled in the role of captaining such a young side, Lee Duxbury was the footballing equivalent of John McClane - a reluctant hero, placed in a situation where he needed to take control. By Paul Prendergast - OWTB.co.uk Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Oxford United

    Jake Wright (2010-present)

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    Oxford United

    Jake Wright (2010-present)

    What made your captain so great? Jake Wright is a leader, commanding respect from everyone he plays with. He never scores, yet he never rants and raves, and if he's sent off he departs the game like a cold assassin leaving the scene of a hit. And he always concludes radio interviews by calling the interviewer "top man". What was his defining moment as skipper? We won a penalty against Burton in 2011. Steve MacLean and Tommy Craddock scuffled over who should take it. Wright walked half the length of the pitch and, without a word, took the ball out of MacLean's hands and gave it to Craddock. Both players apologetically returned to the game without a word. Majestic leadership. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? If the Oxford United Christmas party had a dance contest and Uma Thurman turned up to drag Jake Wright on to the dance floor, he would dance precisely like Vincent Vega from Pulp Fiction. Top man. By Scott Walkinshaw - Oxblogger Twitter: @oxtweeter Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Peterborough Utd

    Mick Halsall (1987-93)

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    Peterborough Utd

    Mick Halsall (1987-93)

    What made your captain so great? Nobody in Peterborough's history has worn the captain's armband with as much pride and passion as Mick Halsall. The central midfielder was a true leader who played with a ferociousness that inspired his team-mates to victory. His example shone to the rest of the squad and resulted in Posh climbing from the fourth division to the second tier - for the first time in their history. What was his defining moment as skipper? His late equaliser in the 2-2 draw with Huddersfield in the 1991-92 play-off semi-final, one of the greatest games ever seen at London Road, gave Posh the momentum they needed to reach the final and ultimately secure promotion to the second tier. He went on to manage the club - and although this wasn't as successful as hoped, he continued to show the same passion off the field as on. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? If Halsall had to be summed up by a movie character it would have to be The Hulk - as you certainly wouldn't like him when he was angry... By John Verrall - Standing On the Glebe Twitter: @JohnVerrall Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Plymouth Argyle

    Paul Wotton (1994- 2008, 2012-present)

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    Plymouth Argyle

    Paul Wotton (1994- 2008, 2012-present)

    What made your captain so great? A tough local hero with a thunderous shot on him, Wotton's will to win and genuine love for Argyle created a special bond between him and the Green Army. His return to Home Park in January last year was a huge ray of sunshine as the club's dark days slowly came to an end. What was his defining moment as skipper? From tears to triumph. As a 20-year-old, Wotton cried on the pitch when Argyle were relegated at Burnley in 1998 and vowed to repair the damage. In 2002 and 2004 he led the celebrations when Argyle were crowned champions of the fourth and third tiers respectively. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Powerful, rather moody and green through and through - it can only be the Hulk. Wotton's roared in the face of several of his own team-mates down the years but behind the fire and the fury, there's a nice guy who just wants what's best for his club and his hometown. By Jon Holmes - We Are Going Up Plymouth blogger  Twitter: @jonboy79 Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Portsmouth

    Paul Merson (2002-03)

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    Portsmouth

    Paul Merson (2002-03)

    What made your captain so great? Paul Merson was the experienced head Pompey needed to chase their Premier League dream. Despite only staying for one season, it was this season that he guided Portsmouth to promotion - he departed when the job was done. Former Portsmouth manager Harry Redknapp described Merson as "the best signing I ever made". What was his defining moment as skipper? Undoubtedly, Merson's defining moment as Portsmouth captain was after his final home game for the south-coast side. An entertaining 3-2 win over Rotherham, in which Merson scored his twelfth goal of the campaign, was enough to secure Pompey the title, with a game to spare, and give Merson the hero's send-off he deserved. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? A leader and someone the team looked up to, Merson was a footballing Yoda. As a Jedi Master, Yoda would advise the less experienced while winning vital battles of his own. 'Merse' was much the same - while he could tell tales of past clubs and experiences, he also proved he still had the force on the field. By Tayler Wilson - Pompey Fans' Network Twitter: Pompey_Fans Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Port Vale

    Tommy Cheadle (1946-57)

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    Port Vale

    Tommy Cheadle (1946-57)

    What made your captain so great? Learning his trade in the army under the tutelage of his unit trainer, a certain Matt Busby, Cheadle joined Vale after service in the second world war. He was centre-half and captain during Vale's greatest season - 1953-54 - and was described by club legend Roy Sproson as "Pound for pound, the hardest man I have ever met". What was his defining moment as skipper? In 1954, Cheadle became the first man to skipper Port Vale in an FA Cup semi-final. The 35-year-old played a key role for the wrong reasons when he gave away a penalty. The resulting spot kick was the game's winning goal, despite stud marks on the pitch showing Tommy's tackle was outside the box. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? With his Brylcreemed locks and chiselled features, our Tommy was scarily akin to British film legend of yesteryear,   - who's probably best known for his role in the 1960 adaptation of Sons And Lovers. Both were war heroes and shared a similar look. We're just not sure how good Howard is at defending… By Rob Fielding - One Vale Fan Twitter: @onevalefan
  • Preston North End

    Sean Gregan (1997-2002)

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    Preston North End

    Sean Gregan (1997-2002)

    What made your captain so great? Players don't obtain nicknames such as 'Guvnor' or 'God' from the Preston faithful without merit, and Sean Gregan, a £350,000 acquisition from Darlington in 1996, spent six seasons cementing himself in the heart of the team and of supporters. Although he wasn't famed for lightning pace or skillful dribbling, he had infectious confidence and belief and his commanding physical presence in the centre of midfield was enviable. What was his defining moment as skipper? The defining season was 1999-2000, when Gregan guided PNE to the Division Two title. An iconic photograph shows Greegs on the Deepdale pitch beaming with pride as he lifts the championship trophy aloft, surrounded by fellow players and thousands of fans. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? James Bond. A British hero willing to do whatever is necessary to succeed, he performs well under pressure and is adored by fans. By Hannah Lupton, We Are Going Up Preston blogger Twitter: @HannahLupton Image courtesy of Action Images
  • QPR

    Terry Venables (1969-74)

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    QPR

    Terry Venables (1969-74)

    What made your captain so great? In almost half a century of supporting QPR, I've seen several great captains - and a fair few disasters. The greats include three homegrown players: Mike Keen, Gerry Francis and Alan McDonald. But my number one is Terry Venables. From the instant he signed from Tottenham - and was immediately made skipper - Venables brought class and panache to the team. As well as leading the side he mentored his successor as captain, Gerry Francis, and later went on to become a very influential QPR coach. What was his defining moment as skipper? Besides helping QPR play beautiful attacking football, Venables - especially in his first season - wanted to take every throw-in, corner, free-kick and penalty. Take your pick from any of his imaginative set-pieces with Stan Bowles and Gerry Francis - they were worth the entrance fee alone. On occasion, he even correctly told our goalie Phil Parkes which way to dive for a penalty kick. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? I'll go for Michael Caine's Harry Palmer in 1965 spy flick The Ipcress File. Sharp, laconic and a master of understated cool. By Mike Lewis - QPR Report Twitter: @QPRReport Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Reading

    Graeme Murty (1998-2009)

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    Reading

    Graeme Murty (1998-2009)

    What made your captain so great? A certified Reading FC club legend, part of the record-breaking 106 point Championship-winning side which won promotion to the Premier League for the first time in the club's history. Not only was he captain during our greatest ever season, it was just one of a wildly successful 11 years at the club. What was his defining moment as skipper? The penalty that secured the Royals' 106 point haul - the second and final goal that he scored in the blue and white hoops. If he were a character from a famous movie, who would he be and why? I'd put him down as Samwise Gamgee from The Lord Of The Rings. He wasn't the centre of attention, but was always a loyal and key figure for the lads from Berkshire. By Steven Curtis - The Tilehurst End Twitter: @RoyalHoops Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Rochdale

    Gary Jones (1998- 2001, 2004-12)

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    Rochdale

    Gary Jones (1998- 2001, 2004-12)

    What made your captain so great? When a young Gary Jones joined on loan from Swansea towards the back end of the 1997-98 season, Dale fans had little idea that he would go on to become the club's record appearance holder, one of the club's all-time leading goalscorers and, generally, Mr Rochdale. His never-say-die attitude and 'midfield general' demeanour were the things that really drew Dale fans to him, as well as his tendency to put the ball in the net from 30 yards out! What was his defining moment as skipper? Finally leading Dale to a long-awaited promotion in the 2009-10 season was a great moment for "Jonah". However, his screamer in our 2-0 victory over Southampton at St Mary's the following season is something that no Dale fan will ever forget. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? John McClane from the Die Hard films. OK, so I struggled with this one but the reasons are obvious: he gets on with the job in hand and possesses a never-say-die attitude. The bald head just adds to the effect (sorry Jonah)! By Rochdale fan Jack Oldham Twitter: @jacko_dale Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Archie Gibson

    Scunthorpe Utd

    Archie Gibson (1960-63)

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    Scunthorpe Utd

    Archie Gibson

    Archie Gibson (1960-63)

    What made your captain so great? Archie Gibson, cultured footballer, led by example and stirred the team to great heights. These were golden times for The Iron, and Archie was the man pulling the strings from the middle of the pitch. He captained us during our most successful season ever (1961-1962), where we narrowly missed out on promotion to Division 1, finishing fourth in the old Division 2. What was his defining moment? The 6-2 demolition in 1961 of Blackpool in the FA Cup, a side which included Stan Matthews and Jimmy Armfield. We were brilliant that day, urged forward in the second half by Archie, with the legendary Barrie Thomas scoring three. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? It would have to be James Bond. He led from the back and was never one to be flustered, no matter what was thrown in his or his team's way. By Ross Gibson - Archie's grandson and editor of Any Old Iron Twitter: @AnyOldIronBlog
  • Sheffield Utd

    Chris Morgan (2003-12)

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    Sheffield Utd

    Chris Morgan (2003-12)

    What made your captain so great? A good captain commands the respect of his peers, organises his team on the pitch, shows an interest in encouraging and developing his team-mates and leads by example. Morgan did this with a quiet authority, while wearing a steely face of thunder. What was his defining moment as skipper? Captaining the club to a Premier League return under Neil Warnock in 2006. When he was photographed holding up the silver salver for the Championship runners-up, he looked like he was trying to snap it in two. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Any good captain lays himself on the line for the team and the fans, and has a strong will to win. So it has to be the Black Knight in Monty Python And The Holy Grail who, after losing his leg, claims: "'Tis but a scratch… had worse." Further blows follow and despite losing other limbs he still believes he is invincible and stands his ground; only claiming a draw when he is left limbless. By Ian Rands - A United View Twitter: @unitedite Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Rotherham Utd

    Peter Madden (1955-66)

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    Rotherham Utd

    Peter Madden (1955-66)

    What made your captain so great? If you like your captains to be tall and commanding, a figure of authority, then Peter Madden fitted the bill. He was a powerful and dominant centre half with a no-nonsense reputation. A figure to be feared but respected, he played for the club for 11 years until 1966. One manager described him as "a born leader". What was his defining moment as skipper? Leading Rotherham United to the first ever Football League Cup final (now the Capital One Cup) in 1961. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? He would be perfect as Lee Marvin's Major Reisman in The Dirty Dozen, driving on underachievers and whipping them into shape. By Les Payne - The Sheffield Star 
  • Sheffield Weds

    Lee Bullen (2004-08)

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    Sheffield Weds

    Lee Bullen (2004-08)

    What made your captain so great? Lee Bullen was an absolute model professional during his time at Sheffield Wednesday and by a long shot, my most memorable SWFC captain. He played in all 11 positions for the Mighty Owls, and captained us to a play-off final win in 2005 at Cardiff, a match I remember vividly. What was his defining moment as skipper? It was when he donned the goalkeeper shirt at The Den against Millwall. We won 1-0 after we scored while Millwall were celebrating a disallowed goal. If he was a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Bullen would have to be William 'Braveheart' Wallace - both passionate Scotsmen who led from the front, willing to die for the cause (metaphorically in Lee's case). By Sheffield Wednesday fan Joe Crann Twitter: @yeswecrann Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Shrewsbury Town

    Graham Turner (1973-83)

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    Shrewsbury Town

    Graham Turner (1973-83)

    What made your captain so great? Graham Turner is so great because he is a multi-generation legend. He played and managed Shrewsbury Town in the 70s and 80s and came back in 2010 to manage us once more. Since he first graced the famous Gay Meadow in the early 70s, he has grown to become the face of Shrewsbury Town Football Club - and always will be. What was his defining moment as skipper? Probably when he was part of the team that won the Third Division championship in the 1978-79 season. If he was a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Without a doubt he would be Gandalf the White, from The Lord Of The Rings. Both are in their senior years, yet have the utmost respect of their peers and hold within themselves great power and knowledge. By Matthew Nightingale - Up The Town Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Southend Utd

    Kevin Maher (1998-2008)

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    Southend Utd

    Kevin Maher (1998-2008)

    What made your captain so great? Maher's start at the club was atrocious and he was told after two years he did not feature in then-manager Alan Little's plans. Barracked by fans, he could have given up, but he dug in and turned it round, captaining Southend to promotion two years on the bounce. What was his defining moment as skipper? Missing his brother's wedding to help the Shrimpers win the 2005 play-off final confirmed his status as fans' favourite. Never one to display much emotion, lifting the trophy was his first real achievement as a professional - and it showed. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Maher would be the Jamaican bobsled team in Cool Runnings. At first he was hopeless, even derided, and he certainly received an icy reception. However, just when he was approaching the exit door, he turned it around. Despite representing the club for 10 years, he never received a testimonial, just as the Jamaicans missed out on a medal. By Jai Forsyth - All At Sea Fanzine Twitter: @AllAtSeaFanzine Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Stevenage

    Mark Roberts (2009-13)

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    Stevenage

    Mark Roberts (2009-13)

    What made your captain so great? There have been some fantastic skippers in Boro's brief history, but there is one man that stands out - Mark Roberts. Robbo led from the front, showing unabated levels of passion, determination and courage - and he'd expect the same from every other player. Those qualities were vital in Boro securing two straight promotions from non-league to League One. What was his defining moment as skipper? Two moments define Robbo. The first came when he was named caretaker manager after Graham Westley's departure - he steered the team to two wins and a draw. The second was at Tottenham in the Cup; his face indicating that he wasn't satisfied with a noble 3-1 defeat - any loss as skipper seemed to hurt him. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Skippering Boro was not quite the same combination of Shakespearean tragedy and Roman history as Gladiator, but Maximus Decimus Meridius springs to mind. We're bordering on hyperbole, but the ability to win against the odds, command loyalty and be passionate in battle is what we're angling at. By Pete Hayman - BoroGuide Twitter: @boroguide Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Swindon Town

    Shaun Taylor (1991-96)

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    Swindon Town

    Shaun Taylor (1991-96)

    What made your captain so great? Shaun is the Swindon Town defender and captain to whom all successors have been compared. He consistently led the team by example between 1991 and 1996 with such utter commitment in every way possible. While never being afraid to throw himself into a challenge, he also contributed goals aplenty and had a trademark raised fist celebration. What was his defining moment as skipper? Scoring Swindon's third goal at Wembley in the 1993 play-off final. Standing unmarked in Leicester's box he launched himself at the ball to beat Kevin Poole and clatter into him. While Shaun wasn't captain that day, the victory ensured he would become Town's only captain in the Premier League. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? It'll have to be some sort of no-nonsense, gun-wielding hard nut who you'd try to avoid in the heat of battle. We'll go for the Terminator. By Ron Smith - The Wash Bag Twitter: @thewashbag Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Torquay Utd

    Chris Hargreaves (2007-10)

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    Torquay Utd

    Chris Hargreaves (2007-10)

    What made your captain so great? For me, the one who stands out in recent years is Chris Hargreaves, who led the squad for two successful seasons in the Conference and helped guide us back into the Football League by adding bite, power and energy to the midfield. What was his defining moment as skipper? Hargreaves always led by example. This was clearly evident in the Conference play-off final in 2009, where he scored the crucial first goal against Cambridge United. It was a typical Hargreaves effort: he burst from midfield and evaded a tackle before firing into the top corner. He went on to lift the trophy after the 2-0 win. All of this at the age of 37. If he was a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Han Solo. Hargreaves arrived at Plainmoor with considerable experience, and was the all-action member of the midfield, often coming to the rescue and digging us out of many holes. He was also a big personality in the dressing room, a leader on and off the pitch. A loveable rogue. By James Bennett - Apocalypse Football Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Tranmere Rovers

    Eric Nixon (1988-97)

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    Tranmere Rovers

    Eric Nixon (1988-97)

    What made your captain so great? It's not commonplace for a goalkeeper to be made captain, but in Eric Nixon, manager John King made an excellent choice. He was a commanding presence between the sticks and led by example with his whole-hearted performances. What was his defining moment as skipper? It has to be the play-off final victory over Bolton Wanderers in 1991 at Wembley. Nixon pulled off some vital saves to keep Tranmere in a very tight game. The match went into extra time and Chris Malkin scored the winner, enabling Nixon to climb up the famous steps under the old Twin Towers to hold aloft the play-off trophy. If he was a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Captain Robert Hatch from Escape To Victory. The goalkeeper played by Sylvester Stallone epitomised everything that Nixon had as a player. He showed a never-say-die attitude, putting his body on the line for the cause and, of course, made some outstanding saves! By Paul Harper - Totally Tranmere Podcast Twitter: @totaltranmere Image courtesy of Action Images  
  • Walsall

    Alan Buckley (1973-78, 1979-84)

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    Walsall

    Alan Buckley (1973-78, 1979-84)

    What made your captain so great? After joining Walsall in 1973, Alan Buckley quickly became a club legend, scoring 125 goals in 241 league games. He was sold to Birmingham City in 1978, but returned just a year later to become player/manager. He continued to lead from the front, scoring 49 more goals. What was his defining moment as skipper? One of, if not THE, defining moments must be a magical night at Fellows Park in a 1974-75 FA Cup third-round replay against Manchester United, when he banged in two goals (one a penalty) to knock out the one-time champions of Europe. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Shamefully cliched, but it has to be Rocky Balboa. Much like Rocky, Alan suffered his fair share of knocks, but always got back on his feet to come out on top through his scoring ability and sheer will to win. By Bescot Banter Twitter: @BescotBanter Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Watford

    Lloyd Doyley (2001-present)

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    Watford

    Lloyd Doyley (2001-present)

    What made your captain so great? Lloyd has seen it all as a Hornet: promotion, relegation and financial uncertainty. He's been dropped and told he could leave by a succession of managers, only to prove each of them wrong and force his way back into the team. In 2013 - his testimonial year - he was asked to be captain. Having broken his goal-scoring duck after almost 10 years in yellow, this was the final box left to tick. What was his defining moment as skipper? The defender may only have been a temporary skipper, wearing the armband in Manuel Almunia's absence on 1 March 2013, but Doyley lives and breathes the club. While his stint as skipper has so far been brief, few will begrudge the suggestion that he could be the club's greatest captain. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Watford's affable No12 would have to be James Bond. Known and loved by generations of fans, he's seen highs and lows, good performances and bad. Like 007, he never knows when he is beaten. And despite a long career, he's now in the form of his life, continuing to delight crowds as he fights the good fight for Queen and country. Well, for a corner of Hertfordshire, anyway... By Mike Parkin - From The Rookery End Twitter: @RookeryMike Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Wigan Athletic

    Emmerson Boyce (2006-present)

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    Wigan Athletic

    Emmerson Boyce (2006-present)

    What made your captain so great? Boycey wasn't the club skipper but due to injury, he picked up the captain's armband for the final few weeks of 2012-13 and led the club to arguably the biggest achievement in our history, winning the FA cup in May. What was his defining moment as skipper? Emmerson Boyce reflects everything that the Latics stand for. He is very much a family man, he works hard on community projects, is positive and always has time for the fans. That was demonstrated when he led the Latics out at Wembley before the FA Cup final. Although focused on the task at hand, he still showed compassion and a sense of perspective by lifting the Latics' mascot Joseph Kendrick out of his wheelchair and carrying him on to the pitch, a sight that touched the hearts of so many people. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? I'd have to pick Optimus Prime from the Transformers flicks. Calm, assured and surprisingly well equipped, he leads by example and is very compassionate. By Barry Worthington - Vital Wigan Athletic Twitter: @LaticsSpeyk Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Wolves

    Billy Wright (1939-59)

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    Wolves

    Billy Wright (1939-59)

    What makes your captain so great? Billy Wright was the greatest captain in the history of Wolves. His 20-year Molineux career coincided with the most successful era in the club's history as we collected three league titles and an FA Cup victory. He was totally dedicated to club and country. Despite being the first footballer to marry a celebrity, his focus was always on the game. As one of England's great captains, he shares the record with Bobby Moore for leading out our national side, having done so 90 times. What was his defining moment as skipper? Lifting the FA Cup in 1949, after Wolves overcame Leicester City 3-1. The picture of Wright being carried around the Wembley field on the shoulders of his team-mates remains the most iconic image of our club's proud history. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? If Wright were a character in a movie he'd be Jim Stark from Rebel Without A Cause. Much like James Dean, he was classic, cool and an icon of his time. By Thomas Baugh: Wolves Blog Twitter: @wolvesblog Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Wycombe

    Gareth Ainsworth (2009-13)

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    Wycombe

    Gareth Ainsworth (2009-13)

    What made your captain so great? Gareth, now our manager, is a total legend and all-round proper man's man. He once got the whole Wycombe crew Movembering. He's a gravelly-throated rock god for various pub-rock outfits. He interviewed Slash from Guns N' Roses for BBC Radio. His nickname is 'Wild Thing'. He also captained QPR. What more do you want? What was his defining moment as skipper? Seeing us promoted to League One in gung-ho style in 2010-11. He lunged headfirst at a ball being kicked by a Southend player with not a whit of concern for the potential brain damage that might follow, and seemingly blocked free-kicks with his very mind and being. He's a hero! If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Tousled long locks and grizzled features, method-acting intensity and slightly deranged passion: he's Viggo Mortensen/Aragorn in Lord Of The Rings. Although I'm now obsessed with Game Of Thrones, so he could easily pass for a mix of Ned Stark, Jaime Lannister and The Hound, if you like that sort of thing. By Kerry Andrew - Fever Bitch Twitter: @KJ_Funk Image courtesy of Action Images
  • Yeovil Town

    Terry Skiverton (1999-2010)

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    Yeovil Town

    Terry Skiverton (1999-2010)

    What made your captain so great? Where do you start with Skivo? He's been the archetypal centre-half, he's been the rock at the back for 10 years, and he's taken the reigns as manager and assistant since the end of his playing days. Skivo joined Yeovil in 1999 and led the side, as skipper, through two promotions, an FA Trophy victory and is now part of the management team that will lead the Glovers out at Championship level for the first ever time. What was his defining moment as skipper? For me, it's the moment he took hold of the Conference trophy in 2003 and lifted it high above his head. It wasn't just a record-breaking, title-winning campaign, it was history. Yeovil had waited 108 years to play in the Football League and as Skiverton lifted that trophy, all those failed applications, second- and third-placed finishes were history. Skivo was leading us into a decade of success. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? Buzz Lightyear. Skivo was sent from the future - the Football League - to take a group of lost, non-league toys into the big time. Buzz, like Skivo, is a leader and a commander. You don't argue with Buzz - he has a laser. Skivo doesn't have a laser but he has all the characteristics of a man you can trust. To the Championship... and beyond? By Ben Barrett - Ben Barrett Sports Writing Twitter: @benbarrett10 Image courtesy of Action Images
  • York City

    Ernie Phillips (1954-57)

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    York City

    Ernie Phillips (1954-57)

    What made your captain so great? The 1954-55 York City team made it to the FA Cup semi-finals, beating a Matthews/Mortensen Blackpool en route and taking Newcastle to a replay before bowing out. All the players involved in the team that season have commented on how spirit and camaraderie got them through. With no manager as such, they were driven by the captain - Ernie Phillips. What was his defining moment as skipper? It has to be the semi-final against Newcastle, when he shook the hand of Jimmy Scoular as an equal, not simply as someone pleased to be there. Contemporary reports say his defending across both games was exemplary, especially the draw against the Magpies at Hillsborough on a bog of a pitch. If he were a character in a famous movie, who would he be and why? The tale of the 'Happy Wanderers' of 1954-55 is your classic underdog story. Division 3 northern clubs just don't get to FA Cup semi-finals, let alone come within a linesman's call of winning through to Wembley. With that in mind, Peter La Fleur from Dodgeball. By York City fan John Dobson Twitter: @johnydobbo