This large scale study, conducted on our behalf by YouGov, was launched in November 2013 to discover more about the public’s knowledge, awareness and attitudes towards health, prostate cancer and Prostate Cancer UK.

There was a particular focus on groups of interest, e.g. men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer (men over 50, Black men and men with a family history of the disease in a father or brother), people who know someone with prostate cancer, and how the picture changes between the nations of the UK.

The study employed a mixed methods approach involving a large scale online survey of a representative sample of UK adults (n=2,864), together with three focus groups prior to the survey and four focus groups following the survey.

The UK

General awareness

  • 21% of the UK know someone who has been diagnosed with prostate cancer
  • Only 46% of the UK could identify where the prostate is
  • Only 12% of the UK know what the prostate does
  • 63% of the UK have never heard of the PSA test

Risk factor awareness

  • Age - Only 40% of the UK know that being aged 50 and over increases a man's risk of developing prostate cancer
  • Family history - Only 47% of the UK know that having a family history of prostate cancer increases a man's risk of developing prostate cancer
  • Ethnicity - Only 5% of the UK know that Black ethnicity increases a man's risk of developing prostate cancer
  • 45% of UK men (and 63% of UK Black men) would like to know more about prostate cancer risk factors

Men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer

  • 83% of UK men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer do not classify their own risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer as 'higher than average'. When broken down, this is true of 83% of UK men aged 50 and over, 90% of UK Black men and 50% of UK men with a family history of prostate cancer in a father or brother.
  • Furthermore, 75% of UK men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer told us that even if they were aware that they were at a higher than average risk of cancer, but didn’t have any symptoms, they wouldn't speak to their GP about it. When broken down, this is true of 77% of UK men aged 50 and over, 69% of UK Black men and 65% of UK men with a family history of prostate cancer in a father or brother.
  • Reference  

    YouGov for Prostate Cancer UK. Figures from YouGov Plc. Total sample size was 2,864 UK adults, of which 1,291 were men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer. Fieldwork was undertaken between 13 January and 4 February 2014. The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all UK adults (aged 18+). 2014.

    Last updated: December 2014

Wales

General awareness

  • 18% of Wales know someone who has been diagnosed with prostate cancer>
  • Only 52% of Wales could identify where the prostate is
  • Only 13% of Wales know what the prostate does
  • 58% of Wales have never heard of the PSA test

Risk factor awareness

  • Age - Only 37% of Wales know that being aged 50 and over increases a man's risk of developing prostate cancer
  • Family history - Only 49% of Wales know that having a family history of prostate cancer increases a man's risk of developing prostate cancer
  • Ethnicity - Only 4% of Wales know that Black ethnicity increases a man's risk of developing prostate cancer
  • 51% of Welsh men would like to know more about prostate cancer risk factors

Men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer

  • 89% of Welsh men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer do not classify their own risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer as 'higher than average'.
  • Furthermore, 81% of Welsh men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer told us that even if they were aware that they were at a higher than average risk of cancer, but didn’t have any symptoms, they wouldn't speak to their GP about it.
  • Reference  

    YouGov for Prostate Cancer UK. Figures from YouGov Plc. Total sample size was 503 Welsh adults, of which 130 were men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer*. Fieldwork was undertaken between 13 January and 4 February 2014. The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all Welsh adults (aged 18+). 2014.

    * In the Welsh sample, there were no Black men so this only includes men aged 50 and over and men with a family history of the disease in a father or brother.

    Last updated: December 2014

Northern Ireland

General awareness

  • 17% of Northern Ireland know someone who has been diagnosed with prostate cancer
  • Only 48% of Northern Ireland could identify where the prostate is
  • Only 11% of Northern Ireland know what the prostate does
  • 69% of Northern Ireland have never heard of the PSA test

Risk factor awareness

  • Age - Only 40% of Northern Ireland know that being aged 50 and over increases a man's risk of developing prostate cancer
  • Family history - Only 51% of Northern Ireland know that having a family history of prostate cancer increases a man's risk of developing prostate cancer
  • Ethnicity - Only 4% of Northern Ireland know that Black ethnicity increases a man's risk of developing prostate cancer
  • 44% of Northern Irish men would like to know more about prostate cancer risk factors

Men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer

  • 86% of Northern Irish men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer do not classify their own risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer as 'higher than average'.
  • Furthermore, 72% of Northern Irish men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer told us that even if they were aware that they were at a higher than average risk of cancer, but didn’t have any symptoms, they wouldn't speak to their GP about it.
  • Reference  

    YouGov for Prostate Cancer UK. Figures from YouGov Plc. Total sample size was 504 Northern Irish adults, of which 161 were men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer*. Fieldwork was undertaken between 13 January and 4 February 2014. The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all Northern Irish adults (aged 18+). 2014.

    * In the Northern Ireland sample, there were no Black men so this only includes men aged 50 and over and men with a family history of the disease in a father or brother.

    Last updated: December 2014

Scotland

General awareness

  • 21% of Scotland know someone who has been diagnosed with prostate cancer
  • Only 49% of Scotland could identify where the prostate is
  • Only 14% of Scotland know what the prostate does
  • 63% of Scotland have never heard of the PSA test

Risk factor awareness

  • Age - Only 40% of Scotland know that being aged 50 and over increases a man's risk of developing prostate cancer
  • Family history - Only 52% of Scotland know that having a family history of prostate cancer increases a man's risk of developing prostate cancer
  • Ethnicity - Only 2% of Scotland know that Black ethnicity increases a man's risk of developing prostate cancer
  • 45% of Scottish men would like to know more about prostate cancer risk factors

Men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer

  • 89% of Scottish men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer do not classify their own risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer as 'higher than average'.
  • Furthermore, 80% of Scottish men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer told us that even if they were aware that they were at a higher than average risk of cancer, but didn’t have any symptoms, they wouldn't speak to their GP about it.
  • Reference  

    YouGov for Prostate Cancer UK. Figures from YouGov Plc. Total sample size was 504 Scottish adults, of which 218 were men at higher than average risk of prostate cancer*. Fieldwork was undertaken between 13 January and 4 February 2014. The survey was carried out online. The figures have been weighted and are representative of all Scottish adults (aged 18+). 2014.

    * In the Scottish sample, there were no Black men so this only includes men aged 50 and over and men with a family history of the disease in a father or brother.

    Last updated: December 2014