Blog post by Nick Wright.

16 Oct 2014

October is Black History Month. This time last year we broke the news that 1 in 4 Black men will get prostate cancer at some point in their lifetime. That’s double the risk of all men. Over the past year we’ve been doing all we can to get this message out there and make sure Black men know their risk. This has included adverts in papers and magazines, such as The Voice and The Nubian Times, as well as a float at the Notting Hill Carnival.

Taking the message to the streets in the Notting Hill Carnival  Soca style

This month we're talking about the ‘four things every Black man should know about prostate cancer’. This is an article in the official Black History Month guide, sent out alongside The Guardian, The Telegraph and The Voice. These are:

  1. Know your risk
  2. Know the possible symptoms
  3. Know your rights
  4. Know where you can get support

Recently I spoke to Sarah Toule, Service Development Manager at Prostate Cancer UK. Sarah’s role is to reach men at a higher risk of prostate cancer. One of the key areas of her work is reaching Black men.Sarah Toule, Service Development Manager

“When I joined Prostate Cancer UK in 2009 it felt like our African Caribbean programme was something in isolation from the Black community, with no real framework. Plus it was just me! Fast forward five years and we’ve not only got a programme of activity, but we have a team, trained nurses and we collaborate with leaders in the Black community."

We need your help to understand the 1 in 4 stat

"Over the last year, one of our biggest news stories was highlighting the risk of prostate cancer in Black men. In the UK 1 in 4 Black men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime. This is double the lifetime risk for all men (1 in 8). It’s a stark statistic but it hammers home just how big an issue this is. Awareness of prostate cancer remains low amongst Black men. This must change.

"One of the hardest things to say to people is that we don’t know why 1 in 4 Black men will get prostate cancer. But we need to understand why this is. We think we can learn so much more through targeted research and gathering more health information from Black men. For example, it's really important that men's ethnicity is recorded correctly and consistently in the health system so we can analyse data and learn more about Black men and prostate cancer. To get the message out there we’ve recruited Research Champions. They are 'super supporters' who go out into their communities and talk to Black men about their risk and why we need to understand more.

"If you’re a Black man reading this, please know that you can play a key role and take control of your health. Whether it’s deciding to take part in research or ensuring that your ethnicity is recorded correctly when you visit your GP. These are the messages that our research champions are spreading."

Cultural differences

"I’ve always worked in the Black and Minority Ethnic community, addressing health inequalities. Being from the Seychelles, which is a melting pot of different cultures and identities, I understand the challenges that cultural differences can create. It’s not about race. It’s about different norms and preferences between different communities and different attitudes towards health and healthcare. Many Black men are in an unnecessary situation where they don’t know their risk of prostate cancer. They don't know their rights to services or they aren’t receiving the services they deserve. Together we're improving this. And we're developing strong links thanks to our partnerships in the community to make a real difference.

"In early 2014 we launched a pilot grant scheme to fund community activities with one aim - to help raise awareness of prostate cancer amongst Black men. We’ve funded conferences, small research projects, church events and even a comedy show! Being able to meet people and see the benefits is great. It shows the impact we can have. We’ve already heard of men who have visited their GP and been diagnosed with prostate cancer as a result of attending one of the funded events. Getting an early diagnosis significantly increases your chances of a positive outcome, and this really highlights the importance of this work.

The role of the health professional

"Every activity within our team’s work has one goal – to reach men at a higher risk. One of our team’s most successful projects so far has been taking our Specialist Nurse services into the community. For men, being able to speak to a nurse face-to-face immediately after a talk from one of our volunteers is so useful. It means they can start building relationships with health services. They gain such confidence just from knowing that it’s within their rights to speak to a doctor about their health. Following the success of the pilot we’ve now trained some of our Specialist Nurses to go out into the Black community and support men."

Planning for the future

"We created a new role this year - African and African Caribbean Project Manager – and we are seeing increasing focus on the Black community across everything that we do at Prostate Cancer UK. Having that designated person allows us to realise our ambitions and deliver our intentions, so who knows where we might be in another six years time!

"We are also partnering with the Be Clear on Cancer campaign to pilot a programme in parts of London, engaging Black men to know more about their risk and speak to their GP if they’re worried. Projects like this are only possible if we, Public Health England, GPs, campaigners, volunteers and leaders in the Black community work together. It’s vital more Black men know about prostate cancer, their risk, and their rights and where they can go for support."


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