We respond to the All Party Parliamentary Group on Cancer report – out today – following its inquiry into the progress of NHS England’s five-year cancer strategy after 12 months.

13 Sep 2016
In - Policy

MPs have released a review of the progress made on the five-year England Cancer Strategy a year after its publication. Having heard expert opinions from over 30 stakeholders, including Prostate Cancer UK, the All Party Parliamentary Group on Cancer (APPGC) produced today’s report which made three key recommendations to NHS England.

First, to detail year-by-year how much funding will be made available to deliver the strategy over the next four years. Second, to provide greater transparency and feedback on how the strategy is being delivered, who is responsible for each part, and how delivery will be monitored. And third, to make clear how patients and other interested groups – including cancer charities – will be involved in the strategy’s delivery at both national and local level.

Prostate Cancer UK strongly welcomes the APPGC’s report and its recognition of our concerns, including the shortages in the specialist cancer workforce in England, and the holes in national data about men with prostate cancer’s experience of care and their quality of life.

Crucially the report also acknowledges that early diagnosis must focus beyond those cancers that are easier to detect

“There is a clear link between a man with prostate cancer having a more positive experience when supported throughout his journey by a Cancer Nurse Specialist compared to those who don’t receive this provision,” says Lauren Wiggins, our Deputy Director of Support and Influencing, who also urges NHS England to collaborate more with patients and patient organisations.

“Crucially the report also acknowledges that early diagnosis must focus beyond those cancers that are easier to detect and must include those cancers, like prostate cancer, which are challenging to identify because symptoms do not often appear until the disease is advanced,” she continues.

“Excluding this from the implementation plan will leave NHS England unable to fully achieve their early diagnosis ambitions.”

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