Ray Winstone, Charles Dance, Tamzin Outhwaite and John Simm join forces with us to help highlight the plight of men living with prostate cancer in the film Father’s Day. Made in 2013, the film still resonates and its themes – talking about prostate cancer and knowing your risk – are vitally important messages for men today.

14 Jun 2016

Car mechanic Joe (Winstone) knows a thing or two about hidden symptoms under the bonnet. Joe was diagnosed with early stage prostate cancer thanks to the advice of his friend, Jack, who urged him to go to his GP when he started peeing three or four times a night. A tough cookie, Joe is trying to come to terms with his prognosis and grieving for Jack, whose own diagnosis of prostate cancer came too late to save him.

Joining other diagnosed men, including Dave (Simm), whose brother’s diagnosis led him to get checked, and Ade (Cyril Nyri), who as a black man was at a much greater risk of getting prostate cancer (1 in 4 black men will get prostate cancer in their lifetime), Joe finds a troubled solace in the shared experiences of six people affected by this pernicious disease.

Although fictional, the storylines of the main characters and the issues they face will ring true with men (and their families) diagnosed with prostate cancer

Although Father’s Day is fictional, the storylines of the main characters and the issues they face are very real, and will ring true with men (and their families) diagnosed with prostate cancer. Three years down the line it remains a strong film with a compelling message that should not be ignored.

We all know that ignoring prostate cancer won’t beat it, but knowing your risk can help make a difference. You are two-and-half times more likely to get prostate cancer if your father or brother has been diagnosed with it.

Not sure about your risk? Do yourself and your dad a favour: make the time to talk about prostate cancer this Father’s Day.

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