This summer we're touring areas with a high Black population to get an important message out there. 1 in 4 Black men will get prostate cancer. So we've got our double decker bus and are hitting the road to talk to people about what they need to know about prostate cancer and how they can help.

On our third weekend of the tour we're in Nottingham and Bristol.

4 Sep 2015

Nottingham roadshow

Last weekend our bus rocked up at a festival! The Rock and Reggae festival took place in Nottingham for the first time in over 20 years, so we were thrilled to be a part of the festivities. We were joined by some fantastic volunteers and support from local support group Friends with Bredrens and Rose Thompson, director of BME Cancer Communities.

The day kicked off with filming for Notts TV amongst booming reggae sound checks in the background - a taster for the day ahead. We were then on Kemet FM, who were live streaming from the festival. Tey said how delighted they were to see Prostate Cancer UK come back to Nottingham to raise awareness of the increased risk for Black men. Throughout the day, Kemet FM signposted people over to the bus.

Our volunteers did a brilliant job of capturing festival goers attention and getting them to sign up to Men United, all in between some suspect dance moves! And it was great to be part of a health section of the grounds, alongside - wait for it - a giant inflatable walk-through bowel!

Grateful visitors and spirited volunteers

Lots of visitors were curious to climb on board and hear more about what we do. Even one of the police women patrolling the festival stepped inside to talk about her grandfather’s diagnosis and to take some information away for her family. Another visitor spoke about how grateful he was for the excellent support he received from our Specialist Nurses.

Our volunteer photographer was so dedicated to support the roadshow that he came over midway through his holiday in North Wales just so he could be there!

The festival picked up popularity as more locals got into the music, food and festivities. We spoke to many Black men and their families, gave out lots of leaflets and signed men up to Men United, all to the beating sound of Rock and Reggae and the promise of delicious jerk chicken, curried goat and rice and peas.

Our bus then made the four-hour journey down to Bristol, where the curse of bad bank holiday weather hit us. You can never guarantee great weather in Britain, even in the height of summer. But that didn’t dampen our spirits as we took to the streets and started talking to passers by. As with all of the stops so far, the response from the public was overwhelmingly positive. Speaking to men and women, young and old, everyone was appreciative of our efforts to raise awareness.

Perhaps what struck a chord the most was the spirit of our volunteers. Willing to stand in the rain (we did give them umbrellas!) for the duration of the day was testament to their commitment to the cause.

We're down to the last two weekends now, so all aboard for London!

Read this next:

Read more about the tour

27 Aug 2015

This summer we're touring areas with a high Black population to get an important message out there. 1 in 4 Black men will get prostate cancer. So we've got our double decker bus and are hitting the road to talk to people about what they need to know about prostate cancer and how they can help.

On our third weekend of the tour we're in Birmingham.

comments powered by Disqus