Headline statistics (UK)

  • prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK
  • one man dies from prostate cancer every hour in the UK
  • over 42,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in the UK
  • over 10,000 men die every year from prostate cancer in the UK
  • it is estimated that by 2030, prostate cancer will be the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the UK. 

Supporting statistics (UK)

  • over 100 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every day in the UK
  • 1 in 8 men will get prostate cancer in the UK
  • 1 in 4 Black men will get prostate cancer in the UK
  • over a quarter of a million men are living with and after prostate cancer in the UK
  • over half of adults (54%) in the UK don’t know where the prostate is
  • almost 9 out of 10 adults (88%) in the UK don’t know what the prostate gland does

Statistics across the UK

In England

  • over 36,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in England
  • over 9,000 men die from prostate cancer every year in England
  • one man dies from prostate cancer every hour in England.

In Scotland

  • over 2,900 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in Scotland
  • over 850 men die from prostate cancer every year in Scotland
  • two men die from prostate cancer every day in Scotland.

In Wales

  • over 2,400 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in Wales
  • over 500 men die every year from prostate cancer in Wales.

In Northern Ireland

  • over 1,000 men are diagnosed with prostate cancer every year in Northern Ireland
  • over 200 men die every year from prostate cancer in Northern Ireland.

Risk factors

  • only men can get prostate cancer
  • some men have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer than others
  • age: Prostate cancer mainly affects men over the age of 50 and risk increases with age. 9 out of 10 prostate cancer cases are diagnosed in men aged 60 and over
  • family history: Men are 2.5 times more likely to develop prostate cancer if their father or brother has had it
  • ethnicity: 1 in 4 Black men will get prostate cancer in the UK – double the overall risk faced by all men (1 in 8).

Symptoms

  • most early prostate cancers have no symptoms at all
  • when symptoms do occur they can be similar to non-cancerous prostate problems for example enlarged prostate

 The following may be signs of a prostate problem:

  • a weak urine flow
  • needing to urinate more often, especially at night
  • a feeling that the bladder has not emptied properly
  • difficulty starting to pass urine
  • dribbling urine after finishing
  • needing to rush to the toilet, and sometimes leaking before getting there